The Every Student Succeeds Act: What’s in It? What Does It Mean for Equity?

Description

On December 10th, President Obama signed the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) into law. ESSA is the most recent version of the federal government’s biggest K-12 law, the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, which came into effect in 1965. ESSA contains a number of meaningful levers that education leaders, parents, members of the business and civil rights communities, and advocates can use to advance education equity. Learn how these levers represent key building blocks for an equity-focused school system-one that sets high expectations for all students, provides resources necessary for meeting those expectations, measures and reports progress toward them, and ensures action when any school-or any group of students-falls off track.

Presenter

Kelly McManus
Senior Legislative Affairs Associate, The Education Trust

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COMING SOON! Realizing Potential with Mindset: Introduction to New NAPE toolkit and workshop

Description

Mindsets are beliefs about intelligence and how one learns. Those with a growth mindset believe their intelligence can change and are more likely to persist and seek help when struggling at a task. Those with a fixed mindset believe intelligence is static and are more likely to shut down and avoid challenges. Fostering a growth mindset in the classroom helps all students reach their potential and can be especially powerful for students who feel unwelcome in a discipline and think they cannot succeed. This soon-to-be released toolkit provides a research-based overview of growth mindset, including key characteristics, benefits, and strategies to employ in the classroom, as well as activities geared toward helping teachers and students reflect on and foster a growth mindset.

Presenter

Michelle Brown
Equity Instructor, NAPE

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COMING SOON!! Eliminating Barriers by Challenging Gender Norms: Introduction to New NAPE toolkit and workshop

Description

Learning feminine norms is a central rite of passage for nearly every girl. Yet STEM interest may be at odds with femininity, particularly during the “gender intensification” years of early adolescence, when belief in traditional gender norms accelerates and STEM interest begins to decline. Although many programs address external variables such as stereotype threat, implicit bias, and lack of role models, internalized belief in rigid gender norms may be an overlooked key. This open, engaging session will introduce the soon-to-be released toolkit, a partnership between TrueChild and NAPE, and will address key terms and concepts around gender norms. Participants will leave with concrete suggestions to eliminate barriers by challenging rigid gender norms.

Presenter

Riki Wilchins
Executive Director, TrueChild

Meagan Pollock, PhD
Director of Professional Development, NAPE

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COMING SOON!! Expanding Access to STEM through Equitable PBLs: Introduction to New NAPE toolkit and workshop

Description

Project Based Learning (PBL) is a learner-centered pedagogy, where the learners are given a realistic problem and solve it by researching and applying knowledge and skills. As PBLs gain popularity in STEM classrooms, and as the disparity of women and students of color in engineering remains the same, there are specific strategies that can be applied to PBLs to improve equity and access. This session will provide an overview of the new NAPE toolkit and workshops designed to assist educators in creating, evaluating, and administering equitable and effective STEM project/problem based learning (PBL) lessons by utilizing the STEM PBLs for Equity Rubric. With more equitable PBLs, we can increase the diversity of students interested in and pursuing STEM careers.

The toolkit was made possible by funding from the Fluor Foundation.

Presenter

Meagan Pollock, PhD
Director of Professional Development, NAPE

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New Skills for Youth:  Strengthening CTE Systems 

Description

In January, JPMorgan Chase & Co. announced a new $75 million, five year global initiative to address the youth unemployment crisis and expand young people’s access to economic opportunity.  With the global economy requiring a more skilled workforce, New Skills for Youth is designed to increase dramatically the number of young people who complete career pathways that begin in high school and end with postsecondary degrees or credentials aligned with well-paying, high-demand jobs.

Presenter

Sarah Ayres Steinberg

Vice President, Global Philanthropy, JPMorgan Chase

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The Perkins Act – the evolution of civil rights in career and technical education policy

Description

This workshop will cover an overview of how the federal civil rights laws undergird the Perkins CTE program, with an emphasis on the evolution of the OCR Vocational Education Guidelines”. We will track how the equity provisions of Perkins, and the focus on special populations, emerged over the past 40 years, resulting in the federal CTE law being a major civil rights program itself.

Presenters

Michael Brustein, Esquire

Partner, BRUSTEIN & MANASEVIT, PLLC

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The Influence of Social Constructs and Mindsets on Postsecondary Degree Choice: A Research Study

Description:

This session will feature the results of a recent study that was conducted with nearly 1,200 college students. The research is grounded in Lent’s Social Cognitive Career Theory and Dweck’s Mindsets’ Theory. Results will provide practitioners with a general understanding of the influence of academic aptitude, social influences, and mindsets on postsecondary degree choice. Differences between genders as well as students who choose STEM versus non-STEM degrees will be discussed.

Presenter:

Jennifer Jirous, PhD
State Program and Pathways Manager, Colorado Department of Education

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Elements of a Multifaceted CTE Program Serving Special Populations

Description:

In order to maximize learning of students from special populations, CTE programs need to be multifaceted and creative and include components that aid the successful attainment of postsecondary goals. This presentation will feature video-based examples of such components including programs of study delivered through academies, Universal Design for Learning–based teaching strategies, interdepartmental collaboration, external partnerships through advisory committees, participation in CTSOs, and involvement of students in entrepreneurial initiatives and interdisciplinary project opportunities.

Presenter:

Lakshmi Mahadevan, PhD
Assistant Professor, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service

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The Student Choice: The Impact of Stereotype Threat and Micro-aggressions on Student Perseverance, Retention and Success

Description:

Micro-inequities can be defined as differential treatment, based on minority status .These behaviors create internal barriers to persistence for students, reduce levels of self-efficacy, and increase stereotype threat. Through the often inadvertent perpetuation of micro-inequities, educators unintentionally suppress students’ drive to successful completion of academic goals. This workshop will identify the outcomes of micro-inequities within the academic environment and provide micro-affirmative techniques to mitigate the impact of micro-inequities.

Presenters:

Martina Sharp-Grier
Assistant Professor of Sociology & Gerontology, Stark State College

Annissa Langworthy
Assistant Professor of Biology/Anatomy and Physiology, Stark State College

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Me, Too! Student Voice as a Critical Component of Achieving Equity in STEM

Description:

Hear Me, from Carnegie Mellon University’s CREATE Lab, is a fresh tool for initiating dialogue and for utilizing the expertise of those most impacted—students—to influence educational practices. Hear Me’s current project in the Greater Pittsburgh Region captures the perspectives of K-12 students on gender bias and STEM and shares their voices with educators, policy makers, and STEM practitioners—bringing students to the table as vital players in moving the needle toward equity in STEM.

Presenters:

Jessica Kaminsky
Project Director, Hear Me, CREATE Lab, Carnegie Mellon University

Colleen Smith
Outreach Coordinator, Penn State New Kensington

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