I am a Critical Scholar and Intellectual in this World: Framing the Black Male Experience in K-16 through an Asset Based Framework

button-download-workshop-filesStrand: Building a Diverse Workforce
Thursday, April 27, 2017
Session V: 8:15 – 9:30 AM

ABSTRACT

Far too often, the narrative associated with the Black male experience in education and society is situated at the intersection of deficit language and deficit thinking. While current data suggest that far too many Black men and boys are struggling in school, and challenged in other ways, it’s imperative to recognize that not all Black men and boys struggle or live in a perpetual state of chaos. As such, we must consider the complexity of this narrative. Those in the field of Black Male Achievement have continued to push forward work that elevates “narrative change” as a part of the ethos of the Black male experience. This session will challenge our assumptions about Black men and boys in society and education, while also elevating concrete supports and research that embraces the humanity of Black men and boys. It is the intention of this session to provide participants with tools that are applicable in K-16 while also providing a reflective space to build a community of practice in the field of Black Male Achievement.

simmons-1216PRESENTER

Robert Simmons, III, PhD

Vice President of Strategy and Innovation
Campaign for Black Male Achievement

Biography: Currently serving as the Vice President of Strategy and Innovation for the Campaign for Black Male Achievement (CBMA), Dr. Robert W. Simmons III is responsible for the national implementation and development of CBMA’s High School Excellence framework, and other place based efforts including mapping the impact of high quality early childhood education on high school completion rates for Black men and boys. CBMA has been recognized by the White House as a key national ally and partner in advancing President Obama’s vision for boys and men of color.

As a nationally recognized scholar and expert on issues of racial equity, urban education and science education, Robert has shared his expertise throughout the United States and on numerous media outlets including CNN. Robert served as the first Chief of Innovation & Research in the District of Columbia Public Schools. While managing numerous initiatives in the district, Robert was the chief architect of the nationally recognized Empowering Males of Color initiative. As a result of this work, Washington DC was recognized, along with Detroit and Oakland, as one of leading cities working to improve the lives of males of color according to the Promise of Place Report. Prior to joining the DC Public Schools, Dr. Simmons was the founding director of the Center for Innovation in Urban Education at Loyola University Maryland. As a tenured professor of urban education and science education, and associated faculty member in African and African American Studies program at Loyola University Maryland, Robert also held a joint appointment as a research associate at the Baltimore Education Research Consortium at Johns Hopkins University.

A former middle school science and math teacher in the Detroit Public Schools, his career has included being nominated twice as the Walt Disney National Teacher of the Year and once for the Whitney and Elizabeth MacMillan Foundation Outstanding Educator Award. Robert has been a fellow with the Woodrow Wilson Fellowship Foundation where he conducted environmental research in the rain forest of Costa Rica, and participated in the Japan Fulbright Memorial Fund. The author of over 40 publications, including the book, Talking About Race: Alleviating the Fear (2013), his research has focused on the experiences of African American males in schools, African American male teachers, science education in urban schools, and the role of race in understanding the social context of schooling. Robert’s next book, Interrupting the School to Prison Pipeline: African American Males as Critical Scholars and Intellectuals, is part autobiographical reflecting on his fathers’ incarceration while offering insights into the educational experiences of African American males.

The author and evaluator of over $2 million in grants, including serving as one of the leading researchers on an NIH funded project designed to support the development of virtual science labs for K‑12 students and teachers, Robert has delivered workshops and lectures throughout the United States and Europe on his research. Robert is a renowned motivational speaker who openly shares his life experiences in Detroit during the height of the crack cocaine epidemic, the mental incarceration he experienced for much of his life due to the physical incarceration of his father, and the significant challenges he faced leaving his childhood home in Detroit to being one of the few African American students at an elite Jesuit high school.

What resources do you need from NAPE? Member Brainstorming Session

button-download-workshop-filesStrand: Building a Diverse Workforce
Thursday, April 27, 2017
Session VI: 9:45 – 11:00 AM

ABSTRACT

Imagine a world where every person is able to fulfill their potential through equal access to and equity in educational options that lead to the entire spectrum of career choices. This vision inspires NAPE’s mission: to build educators’ capacity to implement effective solutions for increasing student access, educational equity and workforce diversity.

Do you share our vision? Do you want to help us reach our mission? Do you want to network and collaborate with other professionals to imagine solutions that can change the world? If so, join us for a fun and completely interactive brainstorming session where we will together dream of the services, resources, and tools we all need to improve educational equity. The ideas generated just might be the next best service or resource to add to NAPE’s growing portfolio!

BONUS!

Don’t miss a unique opportunity participate in a selection of NAPE’s workshops at the Summit! On April 24, 2017, NAPE will provide two strands of preconference sessions, for a total of four workshops, including the option of a networking luncheon. Three of the sessions introduce new Turnkey Implementation Toolkits, so don’t miss the opportunity to preview NAPE’s brand new curriculum! Reserve your seat today. 

You might also be interested in the “How can we help? Overview of NAPE Services and Resources” session on Tuesday, April 25, 2017, Session III: 2:00 – 3:00 PM.

PRESENTER

Meagan Pollock, PhDMeagan Pollock, PhD

Director of Professional Development
National Alliance for Partnerships in Equity

Biography: Dr. Meagan Pollock is the Director of Professional Development for the National Alliance for Partnerships in Equity. In this role, Meagan leads a national team of equity professionals that build educators’ capacity to implement effective solutions for increasing student access, educational equity and workforce diversity.

Before turning her focus on the intersection of education and equity, Meagan worked as an engineer for Texas Instruments. Meagan was a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow, and she holds a PhD in engineering education from Purdue University, a MS in electrical engineering from Texas Tech University, and a BS in computer science from Texas Woman’s University. As an engineer turned educator, Meagan is focused on engineering equity into education and the workforce.

INTENDED AUDIENCE

All are welcome!  If you are interested in brainstorming ways to improve improve access, equity, and diversity, then we need you.

How can we help? Overview of NAPE Services and Resources

button-download-workshop-filesThread: Building a Diverse Workforce
Tuesday, April 25, 2017
Session III: 2:00 – 3:00 PM

ABSTRACT

We can help! The National Alliance for Partnerships in Equity offers research-based, strategy-driven, practical-application-focused professional development services and resources that equip educators with tools to address specific school needs related to equitable learning environments, student academic success and ultimately, readiness to pursue high-wage, high-skill, high-demand careers. This session will provide an overview of NAPE’s professional development offerings, educator resources, toolkits, online learning tools, and comprehensive educational equity programs. Join us for an interactive presentation and discussion, where you can learn, inquire, and explore options to help you achieve educational equity goals.

BONUS!

Don’t miss a unique opportunity participate in a selection of NAPE’s workshops at the Summit!

On April 24, 2017, NAPE will provide two strands of preconference sessions, for a total of four workshops, including the option of a networking luncheon. Three of the sessions introduce new Turnkey Implementation Toolkits, so don’t miss the opportunity to preview NAPE’s brand new curriculum! Reserve your seat today. 

PRESENTER

Meagan Pollock, PhDMeagan Pollock, PhD

Director of Professional Development
National Alliance for Partnerships in Equity

Biography: Dr. Meagan Pollock is the Director of Professional Development for the National Alliance for Partnerships in Equity. In this role, Meagan leads a national team of equity professionals that build educators’ capacity to implement effective solutions for increasing student access, educational equity and workforce diversity.

Before turning her focus on the intersection of education and equity, Meagan worked as an engineer for Texas Instruments. Meagan was a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow, and she holds a PhD in engineering education from Purdue University, a MS in electrical engineering from Texas Tech University, and a BS in computer science from Texas Woman’s University. As an engineer turned educator, Meagan is focused on engineering equity into education and the workforce.

INTENDED AUDIENCE

Any one interested in learning about how NAPE can help you improve access, equity, and diversity at your school or campus!

Developing An Equity / Social Justice Lens and Its Application to STEM

button-download-workshop-filesStrand: Building a Diverse Workforce
Tuesday, April 25, 2017
Session I: 9:15 – 10:30 AM

ABSTRACT

While many folks proffer information about equity and social justice work, not all those advocating it have an accurate understanding of its content and processes. This session lays out a few of the most critical aspects of an equity / social justice lens, discusses how to more deeply develop this lens in an ongoing way, and then makes explicit suggestions for how to use this lens in STEM work. The session is open to all levels of understanding, but is best suited to those with some rudimentary knowledge of the content. It is also as interactive as possible, given the time constraints, and participant examples of how you have done this work in your setting will be welcome.

PRESENTER

NSEE17 keynote speaker Dr. Heather HackmanHeather Hackman, PhD

Summit Keynote Speaker

Read more about Dr. Hackman on her Keynote Speaker Page here

Defying and Dismantling the Diversity Issue in the Tech Industry

button-download-workshop-filesStrand: Building a Diverse Workforce
Tuesday, April 25, 2017
Session IV: 3:15 – 4:15 PM

ABSTRACT

Women make up only 25 percent of the IT workforce, and for people of color that percentage is even lower. Many of the larger IT companies (e.g., Google, Facebook, Apple) are actively working to improve their hiring practices, having created diversity programs to increase the number of minorities in their employ. In order to make a greater impact–one that will address the entire industry–the ultimate solution must involve a combined effort between academia and the IT industry.

PRESENTERS

Gretchen Koch

Executive Director, Workforce Development Sttrategies
Creating IT Futures Foundation

Biography: Gretchen Koch is responsible for the Creating IT Futures Foundation’s IT workforce development and education initiatives. She joined the foundation in 2014 after 11 years of developing national workforce initiatives for CompTIA, where she parlayed her knowledge of industry and educational systems to become a nationally known change agent for IT workforce development.

She works closely with the U.S. Department of Education on its Data Sharing Project and currently leads efforts with the State of Illinois and the Chicagoland Workforce Funder Alliance to develop and promote IT career pipelines in the state. She also is the National IT Career Cluster Leader for the States’ Career Clusters Initiative and the Lead Entity for the IT Learning Exchange for Illinois’ Race to the Top Pathways Initiative. When she is not working from the Foundation’s headquarters, she spends a great amount of time in downtown Chicago working with local leaders in education and workforce development.

Charles-Eaton

Charles Eaton

CEO
Creating IT Futures Foundation

Biography: Charles Eaton leads the Creating IT Futures Foundation, which helps populations that are under-represented in IT and individuals who are lacking in opportunity to prepare for, secure and be successful in information technology careers. Under Eaton’s direction, the foundation has expanded its scope to cultivate best practices in American workforce development and tech-related STEM education.

Eaton is often invited to participate in White House Administration workforce development campaigns and is quoted frequently in the media as an authority on tech workforce development and STEM education. In the past few years, he’s been a speaker at the US News STEM Solutions National Leadership Conference, the League for Innovation STEMtech Conference, the California Workforce Association Spring Conference, the Philly Emerging Tech Conference, the National Career Pathways Network’s Annual Conference, and the Consortium for School Networking Conference.

DESCRIPTION

Through innovative collaborations among academia and corporate America, we can dismantle the lack of diversity in the information technology (IT) workforce. Women make up only 25 percent of the IT workforce, and for people of color that percentage is even lower. Many of the larger IT companies (e.g., Google, Facebook, Apple) are actively working to improve their hiring practices, having created diversity programs to increase the number of minorities in their employ. In order to make a greater impact–one that will address the entire industry–the ultimate solution needs to involve a combined effort between academia and the IT industry.

Most larger IT firms can cherry-pick the best and brightest computer science majors from the nation’s elite universities. However, by filling their open positions using that strategy, their teams will ultimately lack the diversity they need because those elite universities are not diverse enough.

Resume inflation is rampant in the industry, yet the vast majority of IT jobs do not require advanced degrees. Often an associate’s degree or industry credential is all that is necessary. With that in mind, IT companies should look to academic institutions and programs where there is a diverse student body.

A good example of where this strategy is currently making an impact is IBM’s P-Tech internship program. IBM works with high schoolers in urban areas as they progress toward not only a high school degree but also an associate’s degree at a local city college. Likewise, Cisco is developing a sustained internship program in urban areas where the same students are hired as interns for the company through their high school and college years, giving them experience much like an apprenticeship program.

For those already out of high school, Creating IT Futures works with underserved populations, providing training and certifying them in 8 weeks, preparing them for entry-level IT positions. The program goes a step further after it is completed, connecting graduates to local employers.

In this session, Creating IT Futures Foundation Executive Director, Workforce Development Strategies Gretchen Koch will share strategies on how to defy and dismantle the diversity issue in the tech industry. Presenting with Ms. Koch will be Charles Eaton, CEO of the Creating IT Futures Foundation. Together they will share real-world examples of work-based learning programs, from organizations such as IBM and Cisco.

Attendees will break into groups to brainstorm and identify three to five ways that they could implement workforce-based learning techniques in their own locations.

Following this presentation, attendees should have the basic knowledge they need to create similar programs in their communities, in order to attract and develop a more diverse IT workforce. They will also have real-world examples to which they can refer to demonstrate that these programs are successful when implemented properly.

INTENDED AUDIENCE

This session is useful for all attendees, researchers, and practitioners with any level of experience.

Building Capacity: Preparing FIRST for the Race to STEM Access and Opportunity

button-download-workshop-filesStrand: Building a Diverse Workforce
Tuesday, April 25, 2017
Session II: 10:45 AM – 12:00 PM

ABSTRACT

This session provides an opportunity to learn from FIRST’s “race” toward equity, diversity, and inclusion. FIRST will offer its rationale for building organizational capacity to respond to shifting national demographics and address the need for future STEM professionals, and for positioning its programs to be a solution. Attendees will learn about three core strategies: (1) Partnerships and Alliances, (2) Professional Learning—a NAPE collaboration, and (3) Pilot Initiatives.

PRESENTER

HENDERSON_shelley 2017Shelley Henderson, MSeD

Diversity & Inclusion Manager
FIRST

Biography: Shelley Henderson is the Diversity & Inclusion Manager for FIRST—For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology—a global New Hampshire-based nonprofit that offers accessible, innovative programs to motivate young people to pursue education and career opportunities in science, technology, engineering, and math, while building self-confidence, knowledge, and life skills. She leads its national STEM equity initiative to design and implement strategies that will not only improve the diversity of K-12 program participation but will also embed inclusion within the FIRST organization and field implementation. Shelley has defined and prioritized underrepresented and underserved populations to design laser-focused strategies aligned with metrics for optimal impact.

DESCRIPTION

Our country’s demographics are shifting—and our economic fate will hinge on how we respond to these changes. As the population grows more diverse and people of color become the majority, equity—just and fair inclusion of diverse populations—has become an imperative. Diversity is an asset, but rising inequalities and persistent racial gaps in health, wealth, income, employment, education, and opportunity prevent low-income people, people of color, and other underserved populations from realizing their full potential. The jobs of the future will require higher levels of skills and education, but our education and job training systems are not adequately preparing the Latinos, African Americans, and other underserved populations. Attendees will be presented with some national data related to the above from the PolicyLink National Equity Atlas and with local data from 1 or 2 attendees. Attendees will also view an opening video on equity and participate in a session-opening icebreaker; we will use the “race track” metaphor throughout the presentation.

STEM education and training offer a pathway to well-paying jobs and entrepreneurial opportunities in the fastest-growing fields. Increasing participation in STEM fields is critical because America needs a qualified workforce, leaders, and innovators to maintain a competitive edge. There is also rapid growth in the need for STEM professionals. Between 2008 and 2018, the nation’s need for STEM professionals will grow by 17 percent–which is more than the projected growth for administrative work, sales, and transportation combined.

The mission of FIRST® is to inspire youth to become science and technology leaders and innovators, by engaging them in exciting, mentor-guided, project-based programs that teach STEM skills, inspire innovation, and foster well-rounded life capabilities. It provides opportunities to develop STEM literacy through a robotics platform. It has four programs–FIRST LEGO League Jr., which serves K-3, FIRST LEGO League which serves grades 4-8, FIRST Tech Challenge, serving grades 7 through high school, and the oldest program, FIRST Robotics Competition, which serves grades 9-12. Attendees will receive take-home information about these programs.

FIRST is committed to fostering, cultivating, and preserving a culture of diversity and inclusion to help achieve STEM equity. It embraces and encourages differences in race, color, creed, religion, sex, national origin, disability, age, sexual orientation, gender identity, income, or any other characteristics that make our workforce and program participants unique. Exploring, developing, and implementing strategies to become more inclusive and ensure access of our programs to all students (as well as access to key support factors) is critical for FIRST to reach its goal and mission. ALL young people should have the opportunity to become science and technology leaders. FIRST will remove barriers to program participation for underserved, underrepresented children and youth. Pursuant to that end, the Diversity & Inclusion Initiative is a concerted, organized effort on the part of FIRST to develop strategies to make its programs more accessible and inclusive.

FIRST has set a strategic priority of making its programs more inclusive and better representative of the communities where teams are located and build a presence where we have little or none. Demographic data on program participation indicates that girls represent 25%-35% of team members at FIRST, and data from the longitudinal study suggests that the majority of youth in FIRST programs are male (68%), white (68%), suburban (51%), from two parent households (88%), and middle class backgrounds (73% indicated $50,000 or more; 19% indicated $150,000 or more). Exploring, developing, and implementing strategies to become more inclusive and ensure access of our programs to all students (as well as access to key support factors) is critical for FIRST to reach its mission. Attendees will learn about the pre-implementation work done and data gathered to prepare for the launch of the initiative.

Strategies:

Attendees will learn about the development and implementation of three core strategies at FIRST: Partnerships & Alliances, Professional Learning, and Pilot Initiatives.

Partnerships & Alliances: FIRST realizes that it will not reach its strategic objective on diversity and inclusions without solid, mutually reciprocal partnerships. FIRST maintains important national alliance and local relationships with a network of organizations, corporations, foundations, institutions, colleges and universities, and others that are committed to sustaining key programs that ignite young minds and advocate STEM. These relationships help increase FIRST visibility and provide valuable resources. At the state/local level, these relationships can have a significant impact in the community by creating more teams, engaging more mentors, and reaching out to more students.

Professional Learning: FIRST is launching training and technical assistance for headquarters staff and field coaches, mentors, volunteers, and partners designed to strengthen both diversity awareness and inclusive practices. An initial assessment will (1) help rate the diversity and inclusion awareness and skillsets within the organization, (2) uncover the unconscious bias, attitudes, and beliefs of training participants that may either strengthen or undermine performance and program implementation, (3) create organizational recommendations on how to inspire culture change, and (4) provide participants with tips and techniques on how to be more inclusive in the areas they may need improvement. A combination of customized online and face-to-face learning will allow FIRST to address gaps in understanding that ultimately encourages improved access to programs for diverse populations and inclusive environments and experiences for children, youth and families. Attendees will learn about FIRST’s progress, tools, and collaborations with partners like the one it undertook with NAPE on micromessaging. This unique program provides participants with an awareness of the power of micromessages, which include looks, gestures, tone of voice, or the framing of feedback that subtly yet powerfully shape our culture, our classrooms, and the individuals within them.

Pilot Initiatives:

FIRST has launched targeted initiatives to build the capacity of communities to develop coalitions that promote STEM engagement and FIRST program participation to increase diversity and foster inclusion. These initiatives are designed to increase the number of underrepresented, underserved youth and enable community leaders to map current resources, identify service gaps or other unmet needs, and provide the supports necessary to initiate program participation (rookie FIRST teams) or improve inclusion (in veteran FIRST teams), and create the metrics and data systems to drive continuous improvement over time. With generous support from donors, FIRST is launching these initiatives and will support as many as 20 communities to improve diversity, inclusion, and implementation of FIRST programs. Attendees will learn about these new coalitions and identify ways they can engage in efforts near them.

INTENDED AUDIENCE

The intended audience includes those with all levels of experience implementing equity, diversity, and inclusion initiatives–from novice to advanced.