Congress, CTE and Perkins Reauthorization

button-download-workshop-filesStrand: Public Policy—Supporting Equity and Education
Tuesday, April 25, 2017
Session IV: 3:15 – 4:15 PM

ABSTRACT

“With a new Administration at the helm, federal agencies are transitioning with new objectives and appointees while those new appointees are becoming acquainted with both federal agency procedures and agency staff. Regardless of these internal agency changes, existing program requirements must be met, regulatory guidance remains essential to program implementation and the federal regulatory process continues. During this session, executive staff from the U.S. Department of Education and the U.S. Department of Labor will provide an overview of their regulatory agencies, their programs and agendas; and will answer questions about upcoming changes that may impact the CTE and Apprenticeship work done at federal and state levels.

Congress, CTE and Perkins Reauthorization
The 114th Congress saw the bipartisan passage of H.R. 5587, the Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 21st Century Act by a voice vote on the House Floor of 405 – 5, but without any real movement in the U.S. Senate. Now, this new 115th Congress has seen changes on the landscape to include a new Chair ‘woman’ in the House Committee on Education and Workforce and a Senate CTE Caucus Co-Chair as a new member of the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pension (HELP) Committee. Both Chambers continue to express interest in wanting address reforms in Perkins that will modernize the legislation to reflect the workforce and overall economic, high-skill needs. Senior congressional committee staff from both the House and Senate will give an update on Perkins – where it stands now and what to expect.

The Federal Regulatory Process: What Can We Expect Moving Forward?

button-download-workshop-filesStrand: Public Policy—Supporting Equity and Education
Tuesday, April 25, 2017
Session III: 2:00 – 3:00 PM

ABSTRACT

With a new Administration at the helm, federal agencies are transitioning with new objectives and appointees while those new appointees are becoming acquainted with both federal agency procedures and agency staff. Regardless of these internal agency changes, existing program requirements must be met, regulatory guidance remains essential to program implementation and the federal regulatory process continues. During this session, executive staff from the U.S. Department of Education and the U.S. Department of Labor will provide an overview of their regulatory agencies, their programs and agendas; and will answer questions about upcoming changes that may impact the CTE and Apprenticeship work done at federal and state levels.

Building Productive Relationships with Policy Makers (Advocacy 201)

button-download-workshop-filesStrand: Public Policy—Supporting Equity and Education
Tuesday, April 25, 2017
Session II: 10:45 AM – 12:00 PM

ABSTRACT

So, you’ve met with and had a great conversation with your elected and/or appointed policy makers. Now what? How do you safely and effectively navigate the boundaries of the relationship process, building upon the opportunity to keep your representatives and their staff informed about the issues that matter to you while complying with the policies of your education agency? This session will help participants establish and develop constructive lines of communication with policy makers and their staff while both complying with state and local education agency advocacy policies and exercising your rights to participate in the democratic process as a citizen.

How to Be an Effective Advocate (Advocacy 101)

button-download-workshop-filesStrand: Public Policy—Supporting Equity and Education
Tuesday, April 25, 2017
Session I: 9:15 – 10:30 AM

ABSTRACT

As school administrators, educators or ordinary citizens, everyone should have a fundamental understanding of the roles and rules of government. As well, everyone should know how to engage their elected and appointed policymakers. This “Advocacy 101” session will provide participants with basic tips on how to be an effective advocate for yourself, your community and the issues that matter most to you and your work. A panel of practioners, congressional staff, policy makers and professional advocates will share their advice and answer questions about how to effectively ‘advocate’ under the 4P Principle (policy, politicians, protocol and politics), effectively using economic and programmatic data to inform and educated policymakers so that you can make an impact on public policy at every level of government.

Becoming Civil Rights Ready!

button-download-workshop-filesStrand: Public Policy—Supporting Equity and Education
Thursday, April 27, 2017
Session V: 8:15 – 9:30 AM

ABSTRACT

This interactive session will look at federal laws enforced by the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Civil Rights and U.S. Department of Justice with regard to secondary education. The presenters will address civil rights laws as they pertain to Title IV of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Vocation Education Programs Guidelines, and Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990.

PRESENTER

BAKER_Shannon_2017Shannon Baker

CTE Education Consultant
North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Biography: Shannon Baker is an education consultant with North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. She works in Career and Technical Education Support Services, where she oversees the areas of Special Populations, Civil Rights and Equity. She attained her Bachelors’ and Masters’ Degrees from North Carolina State University in Business and Marketing Education and was employed as a Business teacher, Career Development Coordinator, and Special Populations Coordinator with Wake County Schools. She is currently an adjunct instructor in the Computer Technologies Division at Wake Technical Community College.

DESCRIPTION

“Beginning in 1973, various civil rights advocacy groups, including the Legal Defense Fund of the NAACP, sued the U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare (now the Department of Education) on behalf of a plaintiff, alleging that the federal government was not enforcing the federal civil rights laws in education. The Federal District Court of Washington, D.C., settled the case by issuing a consent decree in 1977, which required the federal Office for Civil Rights (part of the U.S. Department of Education) to prepare the Guidelines for Eliminating Discrimination and Denial of Services on the Basis of Race, Color, National Origin, Sex and Handicap (the Guidelines) in CTE programs. That document was published in its final form in 1979 and remains in force.
The Guidelines require each state’s education department to develop and implement a compliance and technical assistance program, to prevent, identify, and remedy discrimination on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, and disability in school districts that receive federal financial assistance, in particular, its CTE program.
This interactive session will look at federal laws enforced by the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Civil Rights and U.S. Department of Justice with regard to secondary education. The presenters will address civil rights laws as they pertain to Title IV of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Vocation Education Programs Guidelines, and Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. The presenter will share North Carolina’s model with participants, with the goal of sharing pertinent knowledge and tools for use by local education agencies (LEAs) in becoming civil rights compliant.”

INTENDED AUDIENCE

This presentation will be geared to audiences with experience in secondary education. Stakeholders include, but are not limited to, CTE educators and support staff, school counselors/career coaches, school administrators (principals/assistant principals); and intervention specialists. Novice to competent level of experience on civil rights as it pertains to education is expected.