Coalitions and Collaboration: Impacting Federal Policy

button-download-workshop-filesStrand: Public Policy—Supporting Equity and Education (POLICY)
Thursday, April 27, 2017
Session VI: 9:45 – 11:00 AM

ABSTRACT

NAPE works to advance equity in career and technical education policy at the federal level by collaborating with other organizations over shared policy goals. Working in coalition, partners can leverage expertise and human resources to increase their capacity to make an impact. Learn how NAPE and Advance CTE are working together through the Perkins Coalition to advance the reauthorization of the Perkins Act. This session will also provide you with the opportunity to dialogue with two association heads who have been working on CTE policy for over 20 years each!!

PRESENTERS

Mimi Lufkin
CEO
National Alliance for Partnerships in Equity

Kim Green
CEO
Advance CTE

What resources do you need from NAPE? Member Brainstorming Session

button-download-workshop-filesStrand: Building a Diverse Workforce
Thursday, April 27, 2017
Session VI: 9:45 – 11:00 AM

ABSTRACT

Imagine a world where every person is able to fulfill their potential through equal access to and equity in educational options that lead to the entire spectrum of career choices. This vision inspires NAPE’s mission: to build educators’ capacity to implement effective solutions for increasing student access, educational equity and workforce diversity.

Do you share our vision? Do you want to help us reach our mission? Do you want to network and collaborate with other professionals to imagine solutions that can change the world? If so, join us for a fun and completely interactive brainstorming session where we will together dream of the services, resources, and tools we all need to improve educational equity. The ideas generated just might be the next best service or resource to add to NAPE’s growing portfolio!

BONUS!

Don’t miss a unique opportunity participate in a selection of NAPE’s workshops at the Summit! On April 24, 2017, NAPE will provide two strands of preconference sessions, for a total of four workshops, including the option of a networking luncheon. Three of the sessions introduce new Turnkey Implementation Toolkits, so don’t miss the opportunity to preview NAPE’s brand new curriculum! Reserve your seat today. 

You might also be interested in the “How can we help? Overview of NAPE Services and Resources” session on Tuesday, April 25, 2017, Session III: 2:00 – 3:00 PM.

PRESENTER

Meagan Pollock, PhDMeagan Pollock, PhD

Director of Professional Development
National Alliance for Partnerships in Equity

Biography: Dr. Meagan Pollock is the Director of Professional Development for the National Alliance for Partnerships in Equity. In this role, Meagan leads a national team of equity professionals that build educators’ capacity to implement effective solutions for increasing student access, educational equity and workforce diversity.

Before turning her focus on the intersection of education and equity, Meagan worked as an engineer for Texas Instruments. Meagan was a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow, and she holds a PhD in engineering education from Purdue University, a MS in electrical engineering from Texas Tech University, and a BS in computer science from Texas Woman’s University. As an engineer turned educator, Meagan is focused on engineering equity into education and the workforce.

INTENDED AUDIENCE

All are welcome!  If you are interested in brainstorming ways to improve improve access, equity, and diversity, then we need you.

The Importance of Incidental Learning

button-download-workshop-filesStrand: Strategies for Equitable Learning Environments
Thursday, April 27, 2017
Session VI: 9:45 – 11:00 AM

ABSTRACT

Throughout the day, students gain critical information from informal interactions both inside and outside of the classroom. These interactions rely on spoken language to which deaf students do not have access. These informal interactions result in what researchers call “incidental learning.” We will discuss a study comparing incidental learning for deaf students compared to their hearing peers, identify the barriers they face to incidental learning, and the strategies to overcome those barriers.

PRESENTERS

HOPPER_Mindy 2017Mindy Hopper, Ph.D.

Faculty, Department of Liberal Studies
National Technical Institute for the Deaf at Rochester Institute of Technology

Biography: Dr. Mindy J. Hopper is now entering her 35th year of teaching. She earned her Masters in Education at the Illinois State University and Doctor of Philosophy in Education at the University of Rochester.  Dr. Hopper’s pedagogy is based on access to language and students’ motivation to participate in a community of scaffolding events.  A professor at Rochester Institute of Technology, she asserts that Deaf students have been positioned as relegated bystanders due to spoken language privileges and embedded institutional ideologies. Professor Hopper reminds her colleagues that incidental learning, in addition to formal and informal learning, is a vast and critical component of daily learning. Finally, she argues that schools are accountable for ensuring that their environments be conducive to deaf students’ access to incidental learning opportunities.

Denise Kavin, Ed.D.

Co-principal investigator
DeafTEC at RIT/NTID

Biography: Denise Kavin is a Co-PI for DeafTEC at Rochester Institute of Technology’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf. DeafTEC is a National Center of Excellence funded by the National Science Foundation. In addition, Denise has been teaching at RIT/NTID for over seven years. As an instructional faculty member in the NTID Department of Liberal Studies, Denise teaches a variety of developmental English courses to deaf students in associate-level programs. Finally, she serves as the Special Assistant to the President of NTID for Strategic Decisions 2020.

DESCRIPTION

Both speakers are deaf, and Dr. Hopper conducted her dissertation on incidental learning. The term “incidental learning” is widely used by Deaf Academics. Their deaf epistemologies inform and elicit a common concern. There is a growing trend among deaf students attending schools with hearing peers, and it is typical to find only one deaf student in a class, often isolated even when receiving access services such as sign language interpreting and notetaking. Research has indicated that deaf adults or college students do not realize how much learning through incidental learning they have missed until later in life, often after completing school, including college.

The key is access to incidental information. The research question for the dissertation was posed as “What do deaf students say about the informal interactions that happen at their schools?” This phenomenological study involved middle-school-aged deaf students who attended school with their hearing peers. This qualitative inquiry interpretive study involved a triangulation of seven data sources. Utilizing a constructivist grounded theory analytical approach enabled a discovery of pertinent themes, relationships, and a theory.

Poignant pieces of data from each theme will be shared. The findings asserted that the deaf students have been positioned as relegated bystanders, thus limiting their access to incidental learning and scaffolding opportunities. Moreover, the deaf students in the study argued that they did not have equal access and prefer to have immediate access in order to have a sense of membership with their hearing friends when they convene and engage in discourses. The overall and main theme was that the deaf students have been savvy navigators. It was confirmed that the deaf students transcended the covert challenges through their patterns of resilience and navigation. The Access-Participation Theory explains how the deaf students were positioned as relegated bystanders. The theory calls for a simple principle: The more increased and immediate access one has to incidental information, the more choices that person has for participation. Deaf students have been excluded from participating and learning from informal interactions, crucial dimensions of school learning–the informal curriculum.

It is often that schools overlook the benefits of informal curricula, and it is proven that school environments are often not conducive for deaf students’ access to incidental learning opportunities. Because deaf students are denied access to the wealth of incidental information and scaffolding opportunities because the spoken language is privileged and not accessible, are our educational systems accountable for this dilemma?

Because implications of accessing incidental learning opportunities will be highlighted, some strategies or ideas will be suggested for educators, vocational rehabilitation, mental health providers, and school personnel to consider and attempt in order to support deaf students’ access to such emergent surrounding interactions.

Learning Objectives

o Participants will learn and identify the difference between formal, informal, and incidental learning.
o Participants will learn how incidental learning is defined.
o Participants will be able to identify the barriers to incidental learning for Deaf/HH individuals
o Participants will learn about strategies to open up incidental learning opportunities for individuals who are Deaf/HH

INTENDED AUDIENCE

People who work with individuals with disabilities, individuals with limited English proficiency, and deaf and hard-of-hearing individuals would benefit from this presentation. It is not enough to simply provide access services (e.g., sign language interpreting, real-time captioning, and/or notetaking) in formal settings (e.g., the classroom) to ensure that members of the above identified groups have access to the material that is being shared. Much information is obtained through incidental learning–informal conversations that take place outside of the classroom or other formal settings.

 

Innovative Strategies for Secondary Special Populations Success

button-download-workshop-filesStrand: Innovations on Equity in Career and Technical Education (CTE)
Thursday, April 27, 2017
Session VI: 9:45 – 11:00 AM

ABSTRACT

This interactive session looks at special populations categories, as defined by Perkins legislation (2006) and how North Carolina and one of its local education agencies set the goals for meeting requirements and assurances with local and federal supports.

PRESENTERS

BAKER_Shannon_2017Shannon Baker

Education Consultants (Special Populations/Civil Rights/Equity)
North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Biography: Shannon Baker is an education consultant with North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. She works in Career and Technical Education Support Services, where she oversees the areas of Special Populations, Civil Rights and Equity. She attained her Bachelors’ and Masters’ Degrees from North Carolina State University in Business and Marketing Education and was employed as a Business teacher, Career Development Coordinator, and Special Populations Coordinator with Wake County Schools. She is currently an adjunct instructor in the Computer Technologies Division at Wake Technical Community College.

GRAY_Francisca 2017Francisca Gray

Career Development Coordinator (District Level)
Onslow County Schools

Biography: Francisca Gray is the District Career Development Coordinator for Onslow County Schools in North Carolina. Part of her role includes overseeing the WIOA In-School Youth Program and Career Development Programs. She has written several proposals to the Eastern Carolina Workforce Development Board to receive federal funding to continue providing services to eligible disadvantaged youth. She received her Bachelor’s in Business Administration from Angeles University in the Philippines and Master’s in Secondary Education from the University of Phoenix. She started her career in education as a Human Resource Development Instructor with Coastal Carolina Community College then became employed with Onslow County Schools as a Career Development Facilitator, Business Education Teacher, and Career Academy Coordinator.

DESCRIPTION

Perkins legislation (of 2006) defines special populations by the following groups: individuals with disabilities, individuals from economically disadvantaged families (including foster children), individuals preparing for nontraditional fields, single parents, including single parent women, displaced homemakers and individuals with limited English proficiencies. States that wish to receive Perkins funding for their CTE programs must submit a local plan in order to qualify. This information session will take a look at special populations categories as defined by Perkins and how North Carolina sets its goals for meeting the requirements and assurances. Attendees will also hear from one of NC’s largest local education agencies, Onslow County Schools, about how it provides services for special populations with the use of local and federal supports. One of its most successful programs, titled S.T.A.R.S (Students Transcending and Reaching Success), which is an In-School Youth Program supported by the Workforce Innovation and Opportunities Act (WIOA). The S.T.A.R.S program design focuses on 14 program elements that assists participants in achieving academic and employment success through effective and comprehensive activities. Onslow County will share its program design, which has proven to be a successful model in this area.

INTENDED AUDIENCE

This presentation will be geared to audiences that have experience working in secondary education (grades 9-12). Stakeholders will include, but not be limited to, CTE educators and support staff, school counselors/career coaches, school administrators (principals/assistant principals), and intervention specialists. Novice to competent level of experience on Perkins legislation is expected.

Overcoming Stereotypes Through STEM-Based Literacy Projects Using Peer Mentoring and Leadership

button-download-workshop-filesStrand: Equity in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM)
Thursday, April 27, 2017
Session VI: 9:45 – 11:00 AM

ABSTRACT

After introducing participants to the early childhood/primary grade STEM-based books, the presenters will discuss how schools can provide leadership and mentoring opportunities to students. Most of the discussion will focus on theories used in the program, which breaks down gender and cultural stereotypes embedded in STEM culture and literacy. Participants will select a book and collaborate to explore an accompanying hands-on activity that applies the messages conveyed in the story.

PRESENTER

Jagielski_Donna 2017Donna Jagielski, Ed.D.

Instructional Coach
Roosevelt Elementary School District

Biography: Donna Jagielski received her Ed.D. in 2016 from Arizona State University. The emphasis of her work has been in the area of instructional practices for the STEM based middle school classroom as well as digital and virtual learning. Dr. Jagielski has been serving the K-12 educational field for over 15 years in the capacities of teacher, instructional coach and administrator. Most of her background is within the high school and junior high levels. Using literacy and hands-on activities as a conduit to introduce younger students to STEM based learning, Dr. Jagielski quickly learned of the positive impact this program had on both groups of students. She later launched a similar program with high school students matched with preschool students and an additional program where high school students were matched up with 5th grade students.

DESCRIPTION

Both STEM-based learning and early childhood/primary grades literacy is filled with gender and cultural stereotypes. This STEM-based literacy program is grounded in several theories that support how educators and administrators can refocus their approach to STEM learning as a whole, especially through the powerful vehicle of peer mentoring. With 15 years of experience as a K-12 educator and administrator, the presenter has initiated a several student-led programs that foster fundamental change. All areas of action research produce fundamental change, but none more powerful than YPAR (youth participatory action research). YPAR is utilized first to demonstrate how fundamental change can take place when older students (high school) serve as mentors for either early childhood (preschool) or primary grades (kinder and first). Female high school students who serve in the capacity of leaders and involved in STEM coursework provide clear role models, breaking down the gender stereotypes of females in these roles. Thie program utilizes social learning theory by Bandura, gender schema theory by Bem, and cross-age peer mentoring (specifically the helper therapy principle of Riessman). Because high school students are the driving force behind this program, the impact is rather immediate. This program provides high school students with opportunities for active mentoring whereby they facilitate thought-provoking questions to further examine the potential gender and cultural stereotypes found in such STEM-based books and then examine how to create coordinating hands-on activities that apply the concepts embedded in the storybooks. Placing an emphasis on the environment, various upcycled, reuse, and everyday materials will be used in the accompanying hands-on activity for this session. Participants will explore a variety of hands-on activities that relate to the message of the storybook and that will have relevancy to their local context. The presenter will examine and discuss how teachers and administrators can work in conjunction with the high school students to fully support them in the leadership role, because they are expected to make the decisions on developing the STEM literacy program so that it is most successful for all stakeholders. All participants will receive an electronic copy of the handout for the session upon providing an email address. The handout will include the list of books used in the program and several suggested hands-on lesson components.

INTENDED AUDIENCE

K-12 teachers and administrators. Audience should have some familiarity of STEM based learning. Audience should demonstrate an interest in utilizing peer mentoring, leadership and literacy within their organization.