Congress, CTE and Perkins Reauthorization

button-download-workshop-filesStrand: Public Policy—Supporting Equity and Education
Tuesday, April 25, 2017
Session IV: 3:15 – 4:15 PM

ABSTRACT

“With a new Administration at the helm, federal agencies are transitioning with new objectives and appointees while those new appointees are becoming acquainted with both federal agency procedures and agency staff. Regardless of these internal agency changes, existing program requirements must be met, regulatory guidance remains essential to program implementation and the federal regulatory process continues. During this session, executive staff from the U.S. Department of Education and the U.S. Department of Labor will provide an overview of their regulatory agencies, their programs and agendas; and will answer questions about upcoming changes that may impact the CTE and Apprenticeship work done at federal and state levels.

Congress, CTE and Perkins Reauthorization
The 114th Congress saw the bipartisan passage of H.R. 5587, the Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 21st Century Act by a voice vote on the House Floor of 405 – 5, but without any real movement in the U.S. Senate. Now, this new 115th Congress has seen changes on the landscape to include a new Chair ‘woman’ in the House Committee on Education and Workforce and a Senate CTE Caucus Co-Chair as a new member of the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pension (HELP) Committee. Both Chambers continue to express interest in wanting address reforms in Perkins that will modernize the legislation to reflect the workforce and overall economic, high-skill needs. Senior congressional committee staff from both the House and Senate will give an update on Perkins – where it stands now and what to expect.

The Federal Regulatory Process: What Can We Expect Moving Forward?

button-download-workshop-filesStrand: Public Policy—Supporting Equity and Education
Tuesday, April 25, 2017
Session III: 2:00 – 3:00 PM

ABSTRACT

With a new Administration at the helm, federal agencies are transitioning with new objectives and appointees while those new appointees are becoming acquainted with both federal agency procedures and agency staff. Regardless of these internal agency changes, existing program requirements must be met, regulatory guidance remains essential to program implementation and the federal regulatory process continues. During this session, executive staff from the U.S. Department of Education and the U.S. Department of Labor will provide an overview of their regulatory agencies, their programs and agendas; and will answer questions about upcoming changes that may impact the CTE and Apprenticeship work done at federal and state levels.

Building Productive Relationships with Policy Makers (Advocacy 201)

button-download-workshop-filesStrand: Public Policy—Supporting Equity and Education
Tuesday, April 25, 2017
Session II: 10:45 AM – 12:00 PM

ABSTRACT

So, you’ve met with and had a great conversation with your elected and/or appointed policy makers. Now what? How do you safely and effectively navigate the boundaries of the relationship process, building upon the opportunity to keep your representatives and their staff informed about the issues that matter to you while complying with the policies of your education agency? This session will help participants establish and develop constructive lines of communication with policy makers and their staff while both complying with state and local education agency advocacy policies and exercising your rights to participate in the democratic process as a citizen.

How to Be an Effective Advocate (Advocacy 101)

button-download-workshop-filesStrand: Public Policy—Supporting Equity and Education
Tuesday, April 25, 2017
Session I: 9:15 – 10:30 AM

ABSTRACT

As school administrators, educators or ordinary citizens, everyone should have a fundamental understanding of the roles and rules of government. As well, everyone should know how to engage their elected and appointed policymakers. This “Advocacy 101” session will provide participants with basic tips on how to be an effective advocate for yourself, your community and the issues that matter most to you and your work. A panel of practioners, congressional staff, policy makers and professional advocates will share their advice and answer questions about how to effectively ‘advocate’ under the 4P Principle (policy, politicians, protocol and politics), effectively using economic and programmatic data to inform and educated policymakers so that you can make an impact on public policy at every level of government.

How can we help? Overview of NAPE Services and Resources

button-download-workshop-filesThread: Building a Diverse Workforce
Tuesday, April 25, 2017
Session III: 2:00 – 3:00 PM

ABSTRACT

We can help! The National Alliance for Partnerships in Equity offers research-based, strategy-driven, practical-application-focused professional development services and resources that equip educators with tools to address specific school needs related to equitable learning environments, student academic success and ultimately, readiness to pursue high-wage, high-skill, high-demand careers. This session will provide an overview of NAPE’s professional development offerings, educator resources, toolkits, online learning tools, and comprehensive educational equity programs. Join us for an interactive presentation and discussion, where you can learn, inquire, and explore options to help you achieve educational equity goals.

BONUS!

Don’t miss a unique opportunity participate in a selection of NAPE’s workshops at the Summit!

On April 24, 2017, NAPE will provide two strands of preconference sessions, for a total of four workshops, including the option of a networking luncheon. Three of the sessions introduce new Turnkey Implementation Toolkits, so don’t miss the opportunity to preview NAPE’s brand new curriculum! Reserve your seat today. 

PRESENTER

Meagan Pollock, PhDMeagan Pollock, PhD

Director of Professional Development
National Alliance for Partnerships in Equity

Biography: Dr. Meagan Pollock is the Director of Professional Development for the National Alliance for Partnerships in Equity. In this role, Meagan leads a national team of equity professionals that build educators’ capacity to implement effective solutions for increasing student access, educational equity and workforce diversity.

Before turning her focus on the intersection of education and equity, Meagan worked as an engineer for Texas Instruments. Meagan was a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow, and she holds a PhD in engineering education from Purdue University, a MS in electrical engineering from Texas Tech University, and a BS in computer science from Texas Woman’s University. As an engineer turned educator, Meagan is focused on engineering equity into education and the workforce.

INTENDED AUDIENCE

Any one interested in learning about how NAPE can help you improve access, equity, and diversity at your school or campus!

Expanding Access and Equity in CTE at the State and Local Level

button-download-workshop-filesStrand: Innovations on Equity in Career and Technical Education (CTE)
Tuesday, April 25, 2017
Session III: 2:00 – 3:00 PM

ABSTRACT

Join a panel of state and local leaders in Career and Technical Education who have collaborated with NAPE to deliver critical professional development to teachers/instructors, counselors and advisors, administrators, and community collaborators in order to increase student access, educational equity, and ultimately workforce diversity in high-skill, high-wage, and high-demand career pathways through CTE and STEM. Learn about the innovative Build Your Future Guidebooks for students/families and educators in Ohio; learn about the first Nontraditional Student Summits in Oklahoma and Iowa; and see how Cedar Rapids Community Schools integrated the Program Improvement Process for Equity (PIPE) with their work surrounding the Intercultural Development Inventory. Panel Moderator: Ben Williams, PhD, NAPE Director of Special Projects.

MODERATOR

Ben Williams, PhD

Director of Special Projects
National Alliance for Partnerships in Equity

PANELISTS

Linda O’Conner

Office of Career and Technical Education
Ohio Department of Education

Innovation – Build Your Future Guidebooks: Construction and Advanced Manufacturing

Jeremy Zweiacker

Office of Career-Technical Education
Oklahoma Department of Education

Innovation – Nontraditional Student Summit (Explore NT, Summit, and TA with implementing strategies)

Tara Troester and Ken Morris

Cedar Rapids Community School District

Innovation – PIPE implementation with all four high schools and middle school partners; Explore NT; and integration with Intercultural Development Inventory

Jeanette Thomas

Iowa Department of Education

Innovation – statewide implementation of data dashboards, modified PIPE, and Nontraditional Student Summit 2016

Developing An Equity / Social Justice Lens and Its Application to STEM

button-download-workshop-filesStrand: Building a Diverse Workforce
Tuesday, April 25, 2017
Session I: 9:15 – 10:30 AM

ABSTRACT

While many folks proffer information about equity and social justice work, not all those advocating it have an accurate understanding of its content and processes. This session lays out a few of the most critical aspects of an equity / social justice lens, discusses how to more deeply develop this lens in an ongoing way, and then makes explicit suggestions for how to use this lens in STEM work. The session is open to all levels of understanding, but is best suited to those with some rudimentary knowledge of the content. It is also as interactive as possible, given the time constraints, and participant examples of how you have done this work in your setting will be welcome.

PRESENTER

NSEE17 keynote speaker Dr. Heather HackmanHeather Hackman, PhD

Summit Keynote Speaker

Read more about Dr. Hackman on her Keynote Speaker Page here

Building Relationships and Breaking Barriers: The Power of Story Telling

button-download-workshop-filesStrand: Strategies for Equitable Learning Environments
Tuesday, April 25, 2017
Session IV: 3:15 – 4:15 PM

ABSTRACT

Although there is a sense of urgency for schools to become more culturally proficient, many educators are left wondering where to begin. This presentation promotes personal narratives as a foundation for establishing an equitable learning environment. Participants will be able to use story sharing strategies to build and enhance relationships with students, colleagues, and supervisees. Participants will leave with worksheets, strategies, and activities ready for immediate use.

PRESENTERS

Walker Sandy 2017Sandy Walker

Supervisor of Equity and School Improvement
Calvert County Public Schools

Biography: Sandy Walker is the Supervisor of Equity and School Improvement for Calvert County Public Schools. He is responsible for the school district’s Equity Plan design and implementation, as well as the oversight of Policy #1015 Regarding Equity, with a goal of providing every student with equitable access to high quality and culturally relevant instruction, curriculum, and academic support. Mr. Walker taught secondary English for 18 years in New York State and Maryland. During this time, he also taught English and Education courses at Notre Dame of Maryland University and Marist College. Passionate about teaching, learning, and equity, he sponsored ELL after school programs, Future Educators of America, Minority Scholars, and served on his school’s equity leadership team and the District Equity Leadership team. Prior to public school teaching, Mr. Walker taught Summer Bridge programs for incoming disadvantaged freshmen students at the State University of New York at Buffalo.

Walker Lisa 2017Lisa Walker

Elementary Educator
Calvert County Public Schools

Biography: Lisa Walker started college with an interest in history and culture. She quickly discovered that all of the things she learned informed her how to make decisions in and maneuver through the world. She made it her mission to help children experience this same sense of connectedness and understanding. She has taught English Language Arts and social studies for over 15 years, mostly in a Title 1 school. During this time, she has become a staunch advocate for teaching social studies and providing the opportunity for students to share their voice. Mrs. Walker is a Maryland State Effective Educator Academy Master Teacher, district curriculum writer, and a Maryland State Council for Social Studies Elementary Teacher of the Year.

DESCRIPTION

As educators with more than 40 years combined experience in urban, suburban, rural, and Title I schools, the presesnters have in-depth understanding of the challenges teachers face in reaching their students. Sandy Walker provides weekly presentations to executive leadership, students, and teachers focusing on creating equitable learning environments. Lisa Walker has presented to teachers from across the state of Maryland through the Maryland Effective Educator’s Academy as well as the Maryland Council for Social Studies Annual Conference. Both have applied their understanding of adult learning theory as adjunct instructors for Notre Dame University of Maryland’s education department.

“The real power inside an organization is not buried within a better definition of the box, or the tasks, or a separate department mission and vision to support the overall company mission and vision. The real power is in the relationship between the individuals and with the organization as a whole.” – Keith Richards, THE BLOG The Power of the Relationship

Many districts have realized the importance of equity because of an alarming disparity in academic performance and student discipline among minority groups. Unfortunately, the systemic approach to investigate and remedy these disparities resides in placing students into remedial intervention. This “fix the student” approach falls short for two reasons. First, it ignores a deeper analysis of the quality of the classroom instruction and therefore concludes that students simply need an intervention. Second, it distracts from the focus of our number one resource and strategy for achieving equity: the teacher.

Cultural proficiency is the ability to see the differences among us and to respond to those differences effectively. Furthermore, it is the honoring of the differences among cultures, viewing diversity as a benefit, and interacting knowledgeably and respectfully with a variety of cultural groups. By putting our efforts and resources into helping teachers build culturally proficient learning environments, we can begin to increase achievement for all. A recent study completed by Gelbach and Robinson shows that the teachers who learned of the similarities they shared with students, especially black and Latino students, reported a more positive relationship with their students. Additionally, the achievement gap for their students was narrowed by 69 percent (Fiarman 2016).

Although there is a current initiative for schools to become more culturally proficient, this initiative lacks specific and practical strategies for making cultural proficiency a reality. This presentation promotes the building of equitable learning environments through the use of personal narratives and the building of shared experiences. Participants will be able to use story sharing strategies to build and enhance relationships with other educators and students that are rooted in the respect for, and acknowledgement of, the unique characters of individuals, while recognizing the universal experiences that bind us together.

Warm-Up:

As participants enter the presentation room they will complete a Gallery Walk by placing initials on all of the 10 posters displaying titles of life events such as “Loss of a Loved One,” “Falling in Love,”” “Birth of a Child,”” etc. that they have personally experienced. They will return to the posters later in the presentation to illustrate the similarities among people of various backgrounds.

Participants will complete part one of a two-part survey. Part one simply asks participants to reflect on a struggling student(s), and/or supervisee. The presentation concludes with participants completing part two of the survey, which gives them the opportunity to develop an action plan based on the specific strategies learned during this presentation.

Presentation:

The presenters will introduce oral histories by displaying an image of Tariq and Tabinda Sheikh, a married Muslim couple who immigrated to the United States. Participants will be asked to reflect on their thoughts and wondering questions as they view the image. Tariq and Tabinda’s 4-minute story from NPR Story Corps will then be shared. Participants will return to their original thoughts and add or adjust. We will discuss how, in listening to personal stories, we come to appreciate our differences while recognizing, and hopefully taking comfort in, the universal experiences that bind us together. Participants will reflect on the warm-up Gallery Walk activity to highlight this idea. The presenters will share and demonstrate their experiences of how building relationships through the sharing of personal stories impacted student growth.

Current research that demonstrates that building teacher-student relationships positively impacts student achievement will be shared. Some of this research is listed below.
• http://steinhardt.nyu.edu/appsych/opus/issues/2013/fall/gallagher
• http://www.evidencebasedteaching.org.au/crash-course-evidence-based-teaching/teacher-student-relationships/#identifier_0_1152

Strategies:

Listed below are eight strategies that will be discussed with participants. Participants will complete the “Where I’m From” activity during the session.
1. Where I’m From activity: Begins with poem “Where I’m From” by George Ella Lyons, poem with blanks spaces is given to participants to fill in their personal experiences
2. Family traditions or moment: share unique family traditions, funny or tragic moments
3. Brown bag activity: fill a brown lunch bag with 5-8 items that represent you, present to class or faculty
4. Shared experience: Creating “Our Story”, in what ways can you create a shared memorable experience with students and/or staff?
5. Class project suggestions: paint a mural, plant a school garden, outsource a community project
6. Joke book: Share a Joke a Day with class or faculty
7. Sharing most embarrassing moments: Again laughter brings us together

Conclusion:
To conclude the session, participants will complete part two of the survey.

INTENDED AUDIENCE

This presentation will provide insight into creating equitable learning environments through the use of personal narratives and by creating shared common experiences. The presentation will benefit any educator that is working to build stronger relationships with students and/or the educators under his or her supervision. There is no prerequisite of knowledge required, from novice to expert.

 

The Sunflower County Systems Change Project: From Punitive Punishment to Preventative and Restorative Practices in the Mississippi Delta

button-download-workshop-filesStrand: Strategies for Equitable Learning Environments
Tuesday, April 25, 2017
Session III: 2:00 – 3:00 PM

ABSTRACT

Discipline means to teach. Yet many school districts have discipline policies that reflect punitive practices that excessively exclude students, particularly students of color. By providing a living model of “systems change,” this presentation will demonstrate how addressing the systems that impact young men and boys of color (YMBOC) can not only disrupt the school-to-prison pipeline, but also help to change the overall narrative of YMBOCs in their local community.

PRESENTERS

Carson Aisha 2017Aisha Carson, MPA

Advocacy Coordinator
American Civil LIberties Union of Mississippi

Biography: Aisha Carson is the Advocacy Coordinator for the Sunflower County Systems Change Project, a partnership between the ACLU of Mississippi, Mississippi Center for Justice(MCJ), Sunflower County Consolidated School District, and Sunflower County Consolidated School District P-16 Engagement Council. Her work through the Sunflower County Systems Change Project focuses on education policy and the greater issues surrounding school discipline and the criminalization of Young Men and Boys of Color. She is an alumnus of the University of Southern Mississippi, where she received a BA in Political Science with a concentration in Black Studies. Her experience in volunteering for MCJ and as a civil rights researcher in the Center for Oral History exponentially grew her knowledge of the challenges that face vulnerable communities and their access to quality education helped to shape her aptitude for systems change. Aisha also received a Master’s in Public Administration from Belhaven University.

Liner Jacorius 2017Jacorius Liner

Advocacy Coordinator
Mississippi Center for Justice

Biography: Jacorius Liner serves as the Advocacy Coordinator for the Systems Change Collaborative Project in partnership with the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU). This collaborative is funded by the W.K. Kellogg foundation to address the disparities and disproportionality of Young Men and Boys of Color (YMBOC) around school discipline and youth court referrals. Jacorius received his undergraduate education at the Mississippi University for Women and his Master’s Degree in Public Policy at Mississippi State University. He also works as a graduate researcher at the Stennis Institute of Government where he’s delved heavily into the practicality of community and economic development literature—economic impact studies, feasibility studies, and other applied research paradigms. He is currently a doctoral candidate at Mississippi State University and his expected completion date is May 2017.

DESCRIPTION

Introduction: The session will begin with a community-building circle, a proponent of restorative justice practices that is a preventive measure used to reinforce positive behavior and build relationships with students. This will provide context for the audience about how tools such as community-building circles can be used in schools to provide supportive and inclusive environments for students of color. After the opening activity, the introduction will resume by reiterating the common uses of discipline as a means to exclude students and the results of exclusion on students of color. Based on the framework for the Sunflower County Systems Change Project (SCSCP), the systems change approach evokes the theory that engaging systems, identifying and remedying ailments, and creating different outcomes serves as a framework for sustainable change. The introduction will conclude with a road map (handout) of the process used to educate and implement the systems change model in Sunflower County to address the excessive suspension, expulsion, and referrals to the Youth Court of young men and boys of color (YMBOC).
Based on the 2006 review of exclusionary and zero-tolerance disciplinary policies, the American Psychological Association found no evidence that the use of suspension, expulsion, or zero tolerance policies has resulted in improvements in student behavior or increases in school safety. It found that suspensions and expulsions are linked to an increased likelihood of future behavior problems, academic difficulty, detachment, and dropout. This section of the presentation will outline how the project team partnered with the school district to (1) provide added capacity in addressing the consistent analysis of discipline data and using data to make informed decisions about discipline; (2) increase community involvement in reviewing and making policy recommendations and actual district policy changes; and (3) provide training and professional development to school personnel, helping to expand capacity about school discipline alternatives. This includes teachers, administrators, staff, and school resource officers.
Each year approximately 1.3 million young people drop out of school. Students who have dropped out or been involved in the juvenile justice system are more likely to have been suspended or expelled than their peers. Students that drop out are three times more likely to be incarcerated. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that “out of school” youth are significantly more likely than “in school” youth to become involved in physical fights, carry a weapon, smoke, and use alcohol, marijuana, and other drugs. Economists estimate that raising high school graduation rates would decrease violent crime by 20 percent and property crime by 10 percent. A key component in addressing school push-out is working directly with the local Youth Court. This portion of the presentation will discuss ways to create communication channels between local school districts and Youth Courts to foster understanding of Youth Court processes to inform school district policies. Using lessons learned from the SCSCP, the presenters will provide ways for local communities and districts to avoid criminalizing behavior and provide alternatives to Youth Court referrals, specifically restitution, community service, and, in particular, case support from counselors. These alternatives can be used in lieu of exclusion or Youth Court referrals, and can offer students limited exclusion and the ability to learn from their behavior.
The media often perpetuate negative perceptions of YMBOC. The systems change element of changing outcomes for YMBOC includes changing the larger narrative through media engagement. The SCSCP has made substantial strides in helping to identify local strategies to prevent the criminalization of YMBOC, including incorporating youth voice. This portion of the presentation will outline clear steps to increase positive messaging around YMBOC in local media to aid in narrative change.
The audience will receive a data report that will also detail the strategies discussed in the presentation. The presentation will conclude with questions from the audience.

INTENDED AUDIENCE

Secondary and Postsecondary Educators: new or veteran educators who teach in diverse school settings
Administrators: Specifically administrators who handle school discipline matters
School Counselors: Specifically counselors who work in high-poverty areas or who frequently engage with students with behavorial issues Researchers: Education researchers who have a particular interest in the school-to-prison pipeline and preventative policy

Education, Not Incarceration: Using Higher Education to Challenge Mass Incarceration

button-download-workshop-filesStrand: Strategies for Equitable Learning Environments
Tuesday, April 25, 2017
Session II: 10:45 AM – 12:00 PM

ABSTRACT

More than 2 million people are currently incarcerated in the United Sates. Minorities are disproportionately represented in higher education but represent greater than 60 percent of people in prison nationally. For previously incarcerated students (as is true for students of color), community colleges are the only avenue to higher education. Education is transformative and can lower recidivism while increasing sense of belonging, validation, and student engagement.

PRESENTER

VASQUEZ_beto 2017Alberto “Beto” Vasquez

Outreach Coordinator
San Diego Continuing Education

Biography: Beto Vasquez is currently finalizing his studies at UCSD where he is pursuing a Masters degree in biology. He is committed to becoming a community college professor of biology and ultimately an administrator of higher education. As a formerly incarcerated student, he is all too familiar with the multifaceted challenges faced not only by this demographic, but underserved groups generally. He works for San Diego Continuing Education (SDCE). He is an advocate for education, STEM and restorative justice.

DESCRIPTION

(1) Previous experience coordinating, facilitating, and leading a series of professional development workshops in the greater San Diego County area to educate community college staff and faculty titled, “Education, not Incarceration: Facilitating Success for Previously Incarcerated Students.”
Most recently, the presenter partnered with the Academic Senate for California Community Colleges and the Opportunity Institute to host one of three statewide sessions on Supporting Formerly Incarcerated Students.
The presenter currently serve as Chair for the Warden’s Community Advisory Board at RJ Donovan State Prison, President for the Nostros Alumni Association (a nonprofit committed to assisting men in recovery), Co-Founder of the Urban Scholars Union (an education-based support group for ex-incarcerated students), and a founding member of the Region X (Southern California) Consortium on Education for Previously Incarcerated Students.
(2) It is no surprise that although people of color are disproportionately represented in higher education, they represent greater than 60 percent of people in prison nationally (The Sentencing Project, 2016). There are more than 2 million people currently incarcerated in the United Sates. This population has grown exponentially at an alarming rate of greater than 500 percent over the past 40 years. In California, an exacerbated prison system (over 180 percent capacity) (CDCR, 2016) has led to the imposition of federal mandates on state government to decrease populations within the California Department of Corrections & Rehabilitation (CDCR). This has led to legislature designed to alleviate prison overcrowding. As a result, thousands of inmates have been released in California over the past couple years. Of those released to San Diego County, realignment efforts have led to individuals serving time out of custody or serving local prison time in county jails. Although the state appears to making strides to decrease the inmate population, there is yet much work to do in helping to rehabilitate the formerly incarcerated.
Rehabilitation is the new reality; these individuals will be our neighbors upon their release regardless of one’s biases. The presenter’s personal story, along with many others, serves as testimony that education is transformative and can change lives. For previously incarcerated students (as is true for students of color), community colleges are the only avenue to higher education. With the ability to meet students wherever they are at, community colleges across the state are equipped to provide the opportunities and resources necessary to increase a sense of belonging, validation, and ultimately the engagement of previously incarcerated individuals. It is important to cultivate the necessary partnerships between community colleges and community organizations to develop programmatic solutions, lower recidivism, and increase enrollment, retention, and degree acquisition rates among this population.
(3) This workshop will consist of a brief presentation covering the climate of our current national stance (with a special emphasis on CA) on mass incarceration, the disparities it leads to, and the need for innovative approaches to restore lives. The presentation will be followed by a student panel of formerly incarcerated students who will share their experiences and speak about education’s impact on their rehabilitative process. The panel will be followed by a brief Q&A session and a group dialogue about restorative practices being used (and challenges) in their regions to assist formerly incarcerated individuals seeking higher education and and an improved quality of life.
(4) Handout will be provided.
(5) The goals are as follows:

  • Challenge stigmas surrounding Currently & Formerly Incarcerated (C&FI) populations
  • Create a dialogue about restorative practices (and challenges) in other regions
  • Increase network of reentry allies
  • Discuss regional challenges for nontraditional students
  • Raise awareness of challenges faced by C&FI individuals
  • Identify ways to improve ability to connect with this population
  • Challenge the ability to identify and mitigate personal biases
  • Understand the political landscape with respect to justice reform
  • Contribute to lowering recidivism

INTENDED AUDIENCE

Educators and service providers