button-download-workshop-filesStrand: Public Policy—Supporting Equity and Education
Time: Tuesday, April 17, 2018 from 1:45 – 3:00 pm
Room: Yorktown

ABSTRACT

Digitalization, artificial intelligence, and automation are projected to impact a large number of occupations in the coming decades. This session will review the threats and opportunities posed by automation to different groups of women. It will then discuss how automation and gender equitable access to CTE and workforce development fits into current federal policy discussions, from Perkins to apprenticeship policy.

PRESENTER(s)

ahegewischPresenter 1

Ariane Hegewisch, MPhil
Program Director Employment & Earnings
Institute for Women’s Policy Research

Biography: Ariane Hegewisch is Program Director for Employment and Earnings at the Institute for Women’s Policy Research, an independent research institute in Washington, DC. She is responsible for IWPR’s research on earnings, occupations, and workplace discrimination, and directs IWPR’s work for the U.S. Department of Labor’s Gender Equity in Apprenticeship grant, and co-directs IWPR’s program on Women and the Future of Work. Recent publications include Pathways to Equity: Narrowing the Wage Gap by Improving Women’s Access to Good Middle-Skill Jobs. She was a member of the 2015-2016 EEOC’s Select Taskforce on Workplace Harassment. Prior to coming to the USA in 2001, she taught European human resource management at Cranfield School of Management in the UK. She began her career in London as a policy advisor on sector strategies and women’s employment and training. She received a BSc Economics from the London School of Economics, and an MPhil Development Studies from the University of Sussex, UK.

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kspikerPresenter 2

Katie Spiker
Senior Federal Policy Analyst
National Skills Coalition

Biography: Katie Spiker is Senior Federal Policy Analyst with National Skills Coalition, working to advance NSC’s Washington-based policy efforts through federal legislation, agency regulation and national funding initiatives related to workforce, postsecondary education, and human services polices. In coordination with NSC field staff, she assists local leaders. Prior to joining NSC in 2015, she was the Associate Director of the National Center for Women’s Employment Equity, providing on-site and virtual technical assistance to improve women’s access to nontraditional occupations. Katie has also consulted with the Institute for Women’s Policy Research and the National Women’s Law Center and held positions at Workplace Flexibility 2010 and the National Partnership for Women and Families. Katie is a 2015 Ford Foundation Public Voices Fellow. She holds a J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center and a bachelor’s degree from the University of Miami.

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DESCRIPTION

Since the early 2000s, automation, artificial intelligence, and digitalization have spread rapidly, eliminating some jobs and changing the nature of work in others while also increasing the returns to digital skill; these trends are projected to accelerate substantially during the coming decades (see for example Autor 2015, Frey and Osbourne 2013, Manyika et al. 2017a,b; Muro et al. 2017). The World Economic Forum’s recent analysis of U.S. trends suggests that the majority of workers who may have to change jobs will be women (World Economic Forum 2018). Because women and men tend to work in different occupations and economic sectors and differ in the extent to which they take on family care responsibilities, technological changes pose different threats and opportunities for women than men.

Drawing on the Institute for Women’s Policy Research’s Women and the Future of Work project, this panel will provide an overview of research on the impact of automation on employment, focusing on likely impacts of new technology on the largest occupations and sectors in which women work, showing that threats are particularly pronounced in many administrative and professional middle-skill jobs which used to provide good middle-class earning opportunities. It will highlight the threats and opportunities posed by technological changes to women of different racial and ethnic background, and of different ages.

The session will then turn to Capitol Hill and responses by federal policymakers to the challenges posed by automation and digitalization. Katie Spiker of the National Skill Coalition will discuss how automation and digitalization and its gendered impact fit into ongoing workforce and educational debates around Perkins Act Reauthorization, the promotion of apprenticeships, and related initiatives.

Congress is working to reauthorize the Higher Education Act, the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act, and the Farm bill. Apprenticeship remains a bipartisan buzzword in DC. The administration has identified welfare reform as an area in which they will focus. And as Congress struggles to reach bipartisan agreement on budget and funding levels for the current or future years, those negotiations have become a constant backdrop to authorizing activity.

Automation offers an opportunity and a challenge for these policy discussions. As technology and jobs change, it is more important than ever that our policies support the kind of training that allow workers to build and upgrade their skills in response to these changes.

Participants in this session will come away with an awareness of the major studies and methodologies used for estimating the impact of automation and digitalization on employment, and will get an understanding of the areas of women’s work that are most likely to be impacted. The session will provide participants with an understanding of a who’s who and what’s what on automation, CTE, and workforce development debates on the Hill. The session will end with a discussion on how we can increase the gender awareness of policymakers in relation to pending technological disruption.

Participants in this session will come away with an awareness of the major studies and methodologies used for estimating the impact of automation and digitalization on employment, and will get an understanding of the areas of women’s work that are most likely to be impacted. The session will provide participants with an understanding of a who’s who and what’s what on automation, CTE, and workforce development debates on the Hill. The session will end with a discussion on how we can increase the gender awareness of policymakers in relation to pending technological disruption.

References
Autor, David. 2015. “Why are there still so many Jobs? The History and Future of Workplace Automation.” Journal of Economic Perspectives (29:3)3-30
Muro, Mark, Sifan Liu, Jacob Whiton, and Siddharth Kulkarni. 2017. Digitalization and the American Workforce. Washington DC: Brookings Metropolitan Policy Program. <https://www.brookings.edu/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/mpp_2017nov15_digitalization_full_report.pdf>
Manyika , James, Susan Lund, Michael Chui, Jacques Bughin , Jonathan Woetzel, Parul Batra, Ryan Ko, Saurabh Sanghvi . 2017. Jobs Lost, Jobs Gained: Workforce Transitions in a time of automation. McKinsey Institute; December
World Economic Forum. 2018. Towards a Reskilling Revolution A Future of Jobs for All Geneva: World Economic Forum <http://www3.weforum.org/docs/WEF_FOW_Reskilling_Revolution.pdf> (accessed January 23, 2018)

Event Timeslots (3)

Yorktown
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TUESDAY | YORKTOWN
Digitalization, artificial intelligence, and automation are projected to impact a large number of occupations in the coming decades. This session will review the threats and opportunities posed by automation to different groups of women. It will then discuss how automation and gender equitable access to CTE and workforce development fits into current federal policy discussions, from Perkins to apprenticeship policy.

Session 3 (Tuesday 1:30-2:45)
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TUESDAY | YORKTOWN
Digitalization, artificial intelligence, and automation are projected to impact a large number of occupations in the coming decades. This session will review the threats and opportunities posed by automation to different groups of women. It will then discuss how automation and gender equitable access to CTE and workforce development fits into current federal policy discussions, from Perkins to apprenticeship policy.

Tuesday, April 17
-
TUESDAY | YORKTOWN
Digitalization, artificial intelligence, and automation are projected to impact a large number of occupations in the coming decades. This session will review the threats and opportunities posed by automation to different groups of women. It will then discuss how automation and gender equitable access to CTE and workforce development fits into current federal policy discussions, from Perkins to apprenticeship policy.

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