button-download-workshop-filesStrand: Best practices for equitable learning environments
Time: Tuesday, April 17, 2018 from 9:15 – 10:30 am
Room: Crystal

ABSTRACT

Many diversity frameworks focus on vague notions of culture (like cultural competence) or detour around inequity. The equity literacy framework helps us maximize integrity of equity initiatives by avoiding detours. Based on the idea that there is no path to equity that does not involve a direct confrontation with inequity, it cultivates in educators the ability to be threats to inequity. In this workshop I introduce equity literacy and how it helps us focus on rooting injustices out of schools.

PRESENTER(s)

pgorskiPresenter 1

Paul Gorski
Founder
Equity Literacy Institute

Biography: Paul Gorski has spent the past 20 years working with educators and schools to prioritize equity in every dimension of education. He is the founder of EdChange and the Equity Literacy Institute and author, editor, or co-editor of 10 books including Reaching and Teaching Poverty: Strategies for Erasing the Opportunity Gap and Case Studies on Diversity and Social Justice Education (with Seema Pothini). Gorski is the co-architect (with Katy Swalwell) of the equity literacy framework, a school change and professional development approach designed to cultivate educators who are a threat to the existence of inequity in their spheres of influence. His website for educators, the Multicultural Pavilion, attracts close to 1 million visitors per year. Gorski lives in Arlington, Virginia, with his cat Buster.

Social Media: (LinkedIN)(Twitter)(Facebook)

DESCRIPTION

Many popular frameworks for attending to diversity in schools are built around vague notions of culture (such as cultural competence) or around concepts that detour around equity. The equity literacy framework was constructed to help educators and school systems maximize the integrity of equity initiatives by avoiding these sorts of detours, like all of the rehashings of the bootstrap mentality that have made their way into educational “equity” conversations: grit and growth mindset, for example.

The equity literacy framework is based on several principles crafted to keep educators focused on real equity work. For example, it is based on the principle that there is no path to equity that does not involve a direct confrontation with inequity. It is also based on the principle that equity initiatives should never focus on fixing marginalized people. Rather, they should focus on fixing the conditions that marginalize people. By keeping these ideological principles front and center, equity literacy is designed to cultivate educators who have the knowledge and skills to be a threat to inequity in their spheres of influence.

In this workshop I introduce the principles of equity literacy, concepts that can help deepen educators’ equity literacy, and five guiding questions to help us assess the transformative nature (or lack thereof) of our equity initiatives. I use examples related to race, class, gender identity, sexual orientation, religion, (dis)ability, and other equity concerns.

In response to the questions posed in the call for proposals:

1. I have spent the past 20 years working with educators all over the US on these issues as well as working directly with school systems intent on deepening their equity work. I have presented previous versions of this work at the Summit (under its previous name) in the past.
2. The equity literacy framework was constructed out of several decades of research on best practices related to equity and equity-based leadership in schools. In some way it is an ideological framework, but it is also very practical—for example, we will talk about strategies for helping educators cultivate the ability to recognize subtle inequity or spot policies that humiliate students unintentionally.
3. Participants will engage in several brief activities applying equity literacy skills to their own educational contexts. For example, they will engage in small group discussion about examples of deficit views in their organizations’ policies.
4. Participants will receive several handouts and short magazine-length articles about equity literacy.
5. The whole workshop is built around presenting framing ideas then strategies related to those ideas. Again, they will address students of color, students with (dis)abilities, and a variety of other groups.

Event Timeslots (3)

Tuesday, April 17
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TUESDAY | CRYSTAL
Many diversity frameworks focus on vague notions of culture (like cultural competence) or detour around inequity. The equity literacy framework helps us maximize integrity of equity initiatives by avoiding detours. Based on the idea that there is no path to equity that does not involve a direct confrontation with inequity, it cultivates in educators the ability to be threats to inequity. In this workshop I introduce equity literacy and how it helps us focus on rooting injustices out of schools.

Crystal
-
TUESDAY | CRYSTAL
Many diversity frameworks focus on vague notions of culture (like cultural competence) or detour around inequity. The equity literacy framework helps us maximize integrity of equity initiatives by avoiding detours. Based on the idea that there is no path to equity that does not involve a direct confrontation with inequity, it cultivates in educators the ability to be threats to inequity. In this workshop I introduce equity literacy and how it helps us focus on rooting injustices out of schools.

Session 1 (Tuesday 9:15-10:30)
-
TUESDAY | CRYSTAL
Many diversity frameworks focus on vague notions of culture (like cultural competence) or detour around inequity. The equity literacy framework helps us maximize integrity of equity initiatives by avoiding detours. Based on the idea that there is no path to equity that does not involve a direct confrontation with inequity, it cultivates in educators the ability to be threats to inequity. In this workshop I introduce equity literacy and how it helps us focus on rooting injustices out of schools.

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