button-download-workshop-filesStrand: Public Policy—Supporting Equity and Education
Time: Tuesday, April 17, 2018 from 9:15 – 10:30 am
Room: Yorktown

ABSTRACT

There are significant gaps in our information about post-secondary education and training. We do not know how much students earn after graduating from a program of study or how many are employed. We do not know how these outcomes vary by race/ethnicity, gender, or other student characteristics. This session will discuss the College Transparency Act that would amend the Higher Education Act to provide such information, and how this information would advance efforts to achieve equity.

PRESENTER(s)

Presenter 1

Bryan Wilson, Ph.D.
Director
Workforce Data Quality Campaign

Biography: Bryan Wilson directs Workforce Data Quality Campaign (WDQC), a project of National Skills Coalition (NSC). WDQC advocates for aligned, inclusive, and relevant data systems which inform education and training policies that prepare all Americans for a skilled workforce and support the nation’s economic growth. Previously, Bryan was State Policy Director for NSC, leading NSC’s efforts to assist state-based coalitions and policymakers in the development of specific policy proposals, including providing in-depth analyses of model state policies and proposals. He joined NSC in 2013.

Prior to joining NSC, Bryan was the Deputy Director of the Washington State Workforce Training and Education Coordinating Board, overseeing policy, legislative activities, research, and performance accountability. He holds a doctorate in political economy from Rutgers University.

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DESCRIPTION

There are significant gaps in our information about post-secondary education and training. For example, we do not know how much students earn after graduating from a program or how many are employed. We do not know how their outcomes vary by race/ethnicity, gender, economic status, disability status, or for veterans. And we have no way to compare their outcomes with those of graduates of other programs. Without this information, it is difficult to determine whether education and training programs are equitably providing people with the skills they need for today’s in-demand jobs.

Some states have stepped up and created data systems with public facing websites that show such information. But such information is not available nationwide. The reauthorization of the Higher Education Act (HEA) offers the opportunity to remedy this situation. The College Transparency Act would amend HEA and create a national, student level data network that includes data on student characteristics, programs of study, and employment and earnings outcomes. Students, program administrators, and policymakers would be able to see educational and labor market outcomes for different populations attending different programs of study at institutions around the nation, and the data would be comparable from one program to another. All this, while strengthening protections for privacy and data security.

This data is critical for students who want to make good decisions about enrolling in a post-secondary program, for policymakers who want to responsibly invest taxpayer dollars, and for colleges and other training providers that want to improve programs for all people.

At this session, the Director of the Workforce Data Quality Campaign, Bryan Wilson, will discuss the effort to provide transparent information on post-secondary programs and how this information would advance efforts to achieve equity. Bryan will demonstrate state websites that already provide such information and discuss the College Transparency Act that would create such a data service nationwide.

Bryan oversaw the creation of the most comprehensive state tools for information on postsecondary education and workforce program outcomes (Washington State’s Career Bridge and Workforce Training Results) and is currently working with others in D.C. to enact the College Transparency Act.

The session will include a demonstration of Washington’s Career Bridge website that has descriptions for more than 6,000 programs at four-year colleges, and community and technical colleges, private vocational schools, as well as apprenticeships and training programs run by nonprofit organizations. About 1,600 of the program descriptions include data about completion rates and post-program employment rates, industry of employment, and earnings. The session will also share information from Washington’s “Workforce Training Results,” including labor market outcomes for populations of interest.

The session will provide up-to-date information on the College Transparency Act (CTA) and the effort to create a national student level data network to would provide similar information nationwide. CTA would authorize the collection of student level data from all postsecondary programs eligible to serve students receiving federal financial aid under Title IV of the Higher Education Act. The data would include information on student: race/ethnicity, age, gender, veteran status, and other demographic information. The student level data would be matched with administrative records containing employment and earnings such that one could know the labor market outcomes for students of each population for each program of study.

Session attendees will receive a fact sheet describing the major provisions of CTA. The session will include examples of how data can be used by policymakers and program administrators to improve equitable outcomes, and by prospective students who want to enroll in a program that successfully serves people like themselves.

Event Timeslots (3)

Tuesday, April 17
-
TUESDAY | YORKTOWN
There are significant gaps in our information about post-secondary education and training. We do not know how much students earn after graduating from a program of study or how many are employed. We do not know how these outcomes vary by race/ethnicity, gender, or other student characteristics. This session will discuss the College Transparency Act that would amend the Higher Education Act to provide such information, and how this information would advance efforts to achieve equity.

Yorktown
-
TUESDAY | YORKTOWN
There are significant gaps in our information about post-secondary education and training. We do not know how much students earn after graduating from a program of study or how many are employed. We do not know how these outcomes vary by race/ethnicity, gender, or other student characteristics. This session will discuss the College Transparency Act that would amend the Higher Education Act to provide such information, and how this information would advance efforts to achieve equity.

Session 1 (Tuesday 9:15-10:30)
-
TUESDAY | YORKTOWN
There are significant gaps in our information about post-secondary education and training. We do not know how much students earn after graduating from a program of study or how many are employed. We do not know how these outcomes vary by race/ethnicity, gender, or other student characteristics. This session will discuss the College Transparency Act that would amend the Higher Education Act to provide such information, and how this information would advance efforts to achieve equity.

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