button-download-workshop-files Strand: Equitable leadership practices
Time: Tuesday, April 17, 2018 from 9:15 – 10:30 am
Room: Monroe

ABSTRACT

Demographic shifts are creating the necessity for K-12 systems to actively engage the challenge of school transformation. Policies, practices, and procedures are no longer sufficient to serve the range of diversity that constitutes the growing student groups comprising many large systems across the country. Baltimore County Public Schools has been engaging in systemic equity training in response to changes in its student and community demographic, specifically challenging staff to consider how race, gender, socioeconomic status, language, and access to rigor impacts the schooling process. The examination of which allows for an analysis of how educator beliefs impact outcomes that promote or detract from students’ access to enrollment in higher level courses that will lead to developing skills necessary to choose STEM careers. This presentation will describe the process, lessons learned, and next steps in this systemic work.

PRESENTER(s)

audlinPresenter 1

Jennifer Audlin
Specialist
Baltimore County Public Schools

Biography: Ms. Jennifer Audlin grew up in Maryland before going to Flagler College in Florida for her undergraduate degrees in English–Secondary Ed, Spanish Ed–K-12, and Latin American Studies. She spent 6 months of her undergraduate studies in Santiago, Chile where she worked on improving her Spanish and Cultural Proficiency. After college, she was hired by Baltimore County Public Schools to teach Spanish. She completed her Masters degree in Michoacán, México. Upon returning she worked to create a system of support to Hispanic students and their families and was the first and only to teach a Spanish course to Spanish-speakers with the goal of improving their literacy skills in Spanish and English.  Ms. Audlin currently works in the Department of Equity and Cultural Proficiency facilitating seminars about racial equity, restorative practices and culturally responsive instruction in additional to coaching school and district leaders as the district strives to close achievement gaps while raising the bar.

Twitter: @jaudlin

durant_tracey

Presenter 2

Tracey Durant, Ed.D.
Specialist
Baltimore County Public Schools

Biography: Dr. Tracey L. Durant: Dr. Tracey L. Durant is a Specialist in the Office of Equity and Cultural Proficiency for Baltimore County Public Schools. Formerly Dr. Durant was the Director of Professional Development at Maryland Nonprofits. Prior to joining Maryland Nonprofits, Dr. Durant was the founding Executive Director of the 100 Black Men of Maryland College Access Program (100 CAP). During her tenure as the Coordinator of Learning Assistance at the Community College of Baltimore County (CCBC), she was responsible for coordinating Title III grant initiatives related to improving developmental education pass rates and closing the achievement gap. She holds degrees from Sojourner-Douglass College, Coppin State University and Morgan State University. Dr. Durant serves as President of the Board of Directors for Child First Authority, Incorporated; President of the Maryland Multicultural Coalition, President of the CollegeBound Foundation Alumni Association, and the Governance/Nominating Committee Chair for Chimes Foundation, Incorporated.

Twitter: @traceyldurant

logan_candicePresenter 3

Candice Logan-Washington
Specialist
Baltimore County Public Schools

Biography:  Dr. Candice Logan-Washington is a native of Baltimore, Maryland and was educated in the Baltimore County Public School System. She’s currently a Specialist in the Office of Equity and Cultural Proficiency within the Baltimore County Public Schools and holds a doctorate in Urban Educational Leadership with a dual focus in school administration and social policy from Morgan State University. She is an adjunct professor and researcher at Notre Dame University of Maryland. Her research interests include issues of equity and access for marginalized student populations, teacher preparation, training and development.  She believes 21st century teaching, learning and leading requires us to let go of what we currently know about the educational landscape and embrace the dexterity, alternative routes to mastery, global prospectives and simple complexities that today’s learners have to offer.  She is the wife of Gerry Washington Jr. and mother to Gerry III and Logan Washington

Her favorite quote is: “Spread kindness like confetti”

williams_lisaPresenter 4

Lisa Williams, EdD
Director of Equity and Cultural Proficiency
Baltimore County Public Schools

Biography:  Dr. Lisa Williams: Dr. Lisa Williams is Director of Equity and Cultural Proficiency for the Baltimore County Public School System where she is responsible for all educational equity and access initiatives.  Dr. Williams has held the position of teacher, mentor, university professor, and Title I director over her career in education. She has bachelors’ degrees in biology and psychology, a master’s in psychology, and a doctorate in Urban Educational Leadership with an emphasis in social policy.  She has presented at the local, state, and national level on topic related to improving outcomes for marginalized student populations.  Her dissertation study examined Responsive to Intervention (RtI) and the performance of students attending Title I schools.  She has expertise in the areas of educational equity, culturally responsive practice, and school transformation.  Her first book, When Treating all the Kids the Same is the Real Problem:  Educational Leadership and the 21st Century Dilemma of Difference (co-authored with Dr. Kendra Johnson, Esq.) was released in October 2014.

brown_margaretPresenter 5

Margaret Berrios Brown
Baltimore County Public Schools

Biography:  Margaret Berrios Brown is an educator with twenty years of experience in the areas of Bilingual Education and English language learning.   As a member of team BCPS, Margie continued working in ESOL and transitioned to the Office of Equity and Cultural Proficiency.  Prior to BCPS, she served in a variety of leadership roles with the Cleveland Metropolitan School District with the Multicultural Education Program and Department of Curriculum and Instruction.  She was part of the design team for Cleveland’s first Pre-K -12 International Newcomer Academy (Thomas Jefferson Newcomer’s Academy) for English language learners.   Margie is a graduate of Cleveland State University and is enrolled in the master’s program of Leadership and Equity and Cultural Proficiency at Notre Dame of Maryland University.

DESCRIPTION

In this interactive session, participants will learn how to (1) examine district practices and procedures using a racial equity lens, (2) analyze the critical role of adaptive leadership for educators who are advancing an agenda to eliminate racially predictable achievement outcomes and increase participation in STEM, and (3) provide support to leaders and teachers to address racial disparities and increase participation in and success in STEM.

A primary objective for this session is to challenge educators to re-examine their assumptions, beliefs, and values and interrogate how they have contributed to inequities in opportunities and access to educational outcomes for marginalized and underserved students. This interrogation is necessary to provoke change that will lead to systemic educational transformation and increase in access to STEM for students.

Event Timeslots (3)

Tuesday, April 17
-
TUESDAY | MONROE
Demographic shifts are creating the necessity for K-12 systems to actively engage the challenge of school transformation. Policies, practices, and procedures are no longer sufficient to serve the range of diversity that constitutes the growing student groups comprising many large systems across the country. Baltimore County Public Schools has been engaging in systemic equity training in response to changes in its student and community demographic, specifically challenging staff to consider how race, gender, socioeconomic status, language, and access to rigor impacts the schooling process. The examination of which allows for an analysis of how educator beliefs impact outcomes that promote or detract from students’ access to enrollment in higher level courses that will lead to developing skills necessary to choose STEM careers. This presentation will describe the process, lessons learned, and next steps in this systemic work.

Monroe
-
TUESDAY | MONROE
Demographic shifts are creating the necessity for K-12 systems to actively engage the challenge of school transformation. Policies, practices, and procedures are no longer sufficient to serve the range of diversity that constitutes the growing student groups comprising many large systems across the country. Baltimore County Public Schools has been engaging in systemic equity training in response to changes in its student and community demographic, specifically challenging staff to consider how race, gender, socioeconomic status, language, and access to rigor impacts the schooling process. The examination of which allows for an analysis of how educator beliefs impact outcomes that promote or detract from students’ access to enrollment in higher level courses that will lead to developing skills necessary to choose STEM careers. This presentation will describe the process, lessons learned, and next steps in this systemic work.

Session 1 (Tuesday 9:15-10:30)
-
TUESDAY | MONROE
Demographic shifts are creating the necessity for K-12 systems to actively engage the challenge of school transformation. Policies, practices, and procedures are no longer sufficient to serve the range of diversity that constitutes the growing student groups comprising many large systems across the country. Baltimore County Public Schools has been engaging in systemic equity training in response to changes in its student and community demographic, specifically challenging staff to consider how race, gender, socioeconomic status, language, and access to rigor impacts the schooling process. The examination of which allows for an analysis of how educator beliefs impact outcomes that promote or detract from students’ access to enrollment in higher level courses that will lead to developing skills necessary to choose STEM careers. This presentation will describe the process, lessons learned, and next steps in this systemic work.

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