button-download-workshop-filesStrand: Increasing access and equity in CTE and STEM
Time: Thursday, April 19, 2018 from 9:45 – 11:00 am
Room: Monroe

ABSTRACT

This workshop will focus on girl’s math identity – the belief that you can do math and the belief that you belong – as a gateway to their participation in STEM education and careers. It will look at barriers and reasons why there aren’t more girls or women in STEM, as well as possible solutions – effective approaches, practices, tools and strategies to foster girls’ interest and engagement. Many of which are applicable to other underrepresented students/populations.

PRESENTER(s)

mfroschlPresenter 1

Merle Froschl
Director, Educational Equity
FHI 360

Biography: Merle Froschl is Director of Educational Equity at FHI 360. She has more than 35 years experience in education and publishing, developing innovative programs and materials that foster equality of opportunity for students regardless of gender, race/ethnicity, disability, or level of family income. Ms. Froschl provides leadership and oversight to projects that include curriculum development, professional development, parent education, research and evaluation. Recent projects include Furthering Girls’ Math Identity, Right from the Start in the Digital Age, Great Science for Girls, and After-School Math PLUS.

mstimmerPresenter 2

Maryann Stimmer
Senior Technical Advisor, STEM
FHI 360

Biography: Maryann Stimmer has extensive experience in formal and informal STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) education. She conducts professional development and develops programs and materials that address equity issues around gender, race/ethnicity, and disability. She was the science advisor for Playtime is Science–recognized by the US Department of Education as an exemplary program and is co-author of Playtime is Science for Students with Disabilities. Her publications include After-School Science PLUS and After-School Math PLUS. NASA-funded curricula include Ring World, Design a Discovery Mission, and Exploring the Solar System. She designed and implemented the FUSE model used by The AfterSchool Corporation (TASC) and replicated within other jurisdictions attempting to institutionalize STEM programming.

DESCRIPTION

Girls get the message — from the toys they play with, the TV shows they watch and the attitudes of their parents, teachers and peers — that math is not for them! From an early age, girls are taught that math success is about an innate ability that they lack and that being feminine and being good at math are mutually exclusive. As a result, girls do not develop a positive math identity — an identity that research tells us is key to their interest, participation and persistence in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education and careers. Without a solid background in math, girls will not develop the critical STEM skills that will be required for 60 percent of the new jobs that will become available in the 21st century.

Despite significant progress in closing the gender gap in STEM, inequities in girls’ and women’s participation and persistence in math and across STEM education and careers remain. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, women make up 48 percent of the U.S. workforce but just 24 percent of STEM workers. Within STEM, the largest number of new jobs are in the Computer Science and Mathematics field. However, the gender gap in Computer Science and Mathematics careers has increased rather than decreased, with female representation decreasing since 2000.

This workshop will address the issue with a focus on girl’s math identity – the belief that you can do math and the belief that you belong — as a gateway to their participation in STEM education and careers. It will look at barriers and reasons why there aren’t more girls or women in STEM, as well as possible solutions – effective approaches, practices, tools and strategies to foster girls’ interest and engagement. Many of which are applicable to other underrepresented students/populations.

The workshop, which will include both large group presentation and small-group activity, will include the following:

• First-hand experience: The presenters have first-hand experience with the subject matter. They developed and implemented a successful capacity-building project to further girls’ math identity, funded by the National Science Foundation. The workshop will be based on the findings from that project which included expert convenings, a Networked Improvement Community (NIC), and several Research-Practice Partnerships (RPPs).

• Practical-Application-Focused information: The workshop will present information about current research as well as its practical application. Participants will discuss the importance of key “drivers” that have been identified for improving girls’ math identity (i.e., the practices and systemic changes needed to promote girls’ math identity). The three primary drivers are: 1) Educators’ awareness and implementation of practices, attitudes and beliefs that can support positive math identify formation in girls; 2) parents and other trusted adults in a girl’s life who have positive views and expectations of girls’ abilities in math; and 3) a growth mindset or a positive/productive mindset supporting positive math identity in girls.

• Engage participants in an activity or hands-on learning: The workshop will involve participants in engaging hands-on, minds-on activities. In one, they will examine the messages prevalent in baby congratulations cards and how they may help form notions of differing roles for girls and boys and the link between these early messages and the underrepresentation of girls and women in STEM. In another, they will have the opportunity to discuss a diagram outlining the “drivers” of girls’ math identity and problem-solve actions they can take to address them.

• Provide useful handouts: A packet of materials will be distributed including articles of interest, access to the Girls’ Math Identity website and materials, a copy of the driver diagram, and a list of resources.

• Present effective strategies focused on one or more special populations or other underrepresented groups: The workshop will focus on strategies for engaging girls in math as a way to ultimately increase the participation of girls and women in STEM education and careers. Many of these strategies are applicable to other underrepresented students/populations as well.

Event Timeslots (3)

Thursday, April 19
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THURSDAY | MONROE
This workshop will focus on girl’s math identity – the belief that you can do math and the belief that you belong – as a gateway to their participation in STEM education and careers. It will look at barriers and reasons why there aren’t more girls or women in STEM, as well as possible solutions – effective approaches, practices, tools and strategies to foster girls’ interest and engagement. Many of which are applicable to other underrepresented students/populations.

Monroe
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THURSDAY | MONROE
This workshop will focus on girl’s math identity – the belief that you can do math and the belief that you belong – as a gateway to their participation in STEM education and careers. It will look at barriers and reasons why there aren’t more girls or women in STEM, as well as possible solutions – effective approaches, practices, tools and strategies to foster girls’ interest and engagement. Many of which are applicable to other underrepresented students/populations.

Session 5 (Thursday 9:45-11:00)
-
THURSDAY | MONROE
This workshop will focus on girl’s math identity – the belief that you can do math and the belief that you belong – as a gateway to their participation in STEM education and careers. It will look at barriers and reasons why there aren’t more girls or women in STEM, as well as possible solutions – effective approaches, practices, tools and strategies to foster girls’ interest and engagement. Many of which are applicable to other underrepresented students/populations.

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