button-download-workshop-filesStrand: Best practices for equitable learning environments
Time: Thursday, April 19, 2018 from 8:15 – 9:30 am
Room: Monroe

ABSTRACT

An evidence based model to cultivate campus stakeholder buy-in for equity-based change in campus culture through a series of in-house facilitated professional development programs that teach non-cognitive pedagogy, emphasize why culturally relevant curriculum and programming is vital to student success, provide colleagues with practical tools for implementing non-cognitive practice, and offer colleagues support to develop, research, and disseminate new student success strategies.

PRESENTER(s)

eImhofPresenter 1

Elizabeth Imhof, Ph.D.
Faculty Resource Center Faculty Director
Santa Barbara City College

Biography: Dr. Imhof is the Faculty Resource Center Faculty Director at Santa Barbara City College where she co-directos two Hispanic Serving Institution Federal grants. Before beginning her academic career, she worked as a community organizer facilitating programs to build dialogue and understanding between diverse religious and cultural groups. Dr. Imhof now combines her academic interests and her desire to promote equity and diversity based education at SBCC where she has taught history and Social Justice Research and co-founded SBCC’s Middle East Studies Program. Midway in her career, confronted by falling student success rates, Dr. Imhof began to employ a wide range of non-cognitive/social-emotional pedagogies with great success. She now continues her work and research in non-cognitive learning, curriculum design, and leads experiential workshops to demonstrate to faculty and administrators the essential nature of non-cognitive teaching to student success and equity.

DESCRIPTION

The belief that one does not belong in higher education is among the greatest inhibitors to success for underserved college students. This unique and experiential workshop will demonstrate and present evidence for how non-cognitive/social emotional learning pedagogy works to support student success and persistence through the cultivation of a sense of academic and cultural belonging. The benefit of non-cognitive pedagogy springs from the collaboration among faculty and educational professionals and students who co-produce knowledge to ensure courses and campus programs support student equity, are relevant to students’ experiences and goals, are academically rigorous, and cultivate belonging and community among students, faculty, and other campus educational professionals.

Workshop participants experience examples of non-cognitive teaching from the perspective of the student and leave the workshop with tools and techniques that can be immediately integrated into any academic discipline or program. As participants live through the pedagogy, they more fully internalize the methodologies and appreciate the personal development benefits of the techniques, as well as become grounded in the academic and communication skills they will be encouraged to share with their students.

Despite the documented evidence of the benefits, disseminating affective strategies across a college campus is challenging. Faculty often resent the imposition of perceived outside and trendy teaching practices and actively resist administration or institutional encroachment into the classroom. Administrators and Student Services staff often resist change in their programs because of territorialism and limited resources and funding. The Affective Learning Institute (ALI) provides a model for how to get faculty, administrator, and staff buy-in for sweeping equity-based change through in-house created and facilitated professional development opportunities that lead to a certificate in affective learning that can be completed in a year. Through a series of four multi-day workshops and a monthly Inquiry Group meeting, The ALI model teaches the basics of non-cognitive teaching and learning strategies, emphasize why social-emotional learning and culturally relevant teaching and programming is vital to the success of underserved student populations, provide participants with practical tools for incorporating non-cognitive pedagogy into their classrooms and campus programs without sacrificing core content, empowers participants to develop and research new student success strategies, and provide opportunities for faculty, administrators and staff campus-wide to collaborate and disseminate best practices.

Participants leave the ALI committed to enhancing the quality of relationship between faculty, administration, staff, and students, a key factor for successful student learning, a sense of belonging in the college environment, and student retention. The social-emotional experience of a student is key to learning and the quality of that experience is largely related to a student’s sense of place in the college learning culture. In a recent study of 30,000 college graduates, participants rated “supportive relationships with professors,” as the most important factor in evaluating whether or not their college experience had been worth the cost. According to studies at the Center for Disease Control, school connectedness, which is defined as how strongly students feel a sense that they belong to their school community, may be the number one contributing factor to students’ academic success. A sense of belonging is strongly correlated to educational outcomes including school attendance, staying in school longer; and higher grades.
Participants will understand how equity, relevance, and belonging increases student success through experiencing non-cognitive pedagogy from the perspective of the student and reviewing evidence demonstrating the success of non-cognitive teaching and learning methods. We will provide national evidence for how and why non-cognitive teaching works, evidence from our campus programs for how these practices have earned SBCC national recognition as one of the leading community colleges in America including the prestigious Aspen award for #1 Community College in America, and the Affective Learning Institute (ALI) model for comprehensive, faculty-led professional development that supports SBCC as one of the most successful community colleges in the country with student success rates far above the national average.

Event Timeslots (3)

Thursday, April 19
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THURSDAY | MONROE
An evidence based model to cultivate campus stakeholder buy-in for equity-based change in campus culture through a series of in-house facilitated professional development programs that teach non-cognitive pedagogy, emphasize why culturally relevant curriculum and programming is vital to student success, provide colleagues with practical tools for implementing non-cognitive practice, and offer colleagues support to develop, research, and disseminate new student success strategies.

Monroe
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THURSDAY | MONROE
An evidence based model to cultivate campus stakeholder buy-in for equity-based change in campus culture through a series of in-house facilitated professional development programs that teach non-cognitive pedagogy, emphasize why culturally relevant curriculum and programming is vital to student success, provide colleagues with practical tools for implementing non-cognitive practice, and offer colleagues support to develop, research, and disseminate new student success strategies.

Session 4 (Thursday 8:15-9:30)
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THURSDAY | MONROE
An evidence based model to cultivate campus stakeholder buy-in for equity-based change in campus culture through a series of in-house facilitated professional development programs that teach non-cognitive pedagogy, emphasize why culturally relevant curriculum and programming is vital to student success, provide colleagues with practical tools for implementing non-cognitive practice, and offer colleagues support to develop, research, and disseminate new student success strategies.

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