button-download-workshop-filesStrand: Best practices for equitable learning environments
Time: Tuesday, April 17, 2018 from 1:45 – 3:00 pm
Room: Crystal

ABSTRACT

This session will present research examining the ways White teachers perceive and respond to student behavior based on race. Findings from a study involving 125 White teachers from school districts in New England that reported disproportionate discipline rates will be presented. Participants in this session will self-reflect on their own beliefs and biases, use multiple lenses to review information shared by others, and collaborate to offer take-away strategies to disrupt inequity in education.

PRESENTER(s)

ctapleyPresenter 1

Colleen Tapley, Ed.D.
Assistant Professor, Program Coordinator for Undergraduate and Graduate Special Education
Southern New Hampshire University

Biography: Colleen Tapley received her doctorate in Leadership and Learning from Rivier University in May of 2016. She has over 16 years experience in the field of education with experience in special education, elementary education, middle school, and administration. Tapley has a strong background in curriculum development and a focus on preparing teachers to implement STEM and LEGO Robotics in grades K-6. Her doctoral dissertation examined the ways White teachers perceive and respond to student behavior based on racial identity status and racial attitudes. Tapley also has experience developing and implementing trainings to improve educators’ cultural competency. She recently presented a session called “Who Am I? Exploring Learner Identity and Biases to Disrupt Inequity in Education” at the 2017 Learner Research Network international conference at the University of Hawaii. Tapley became a full time faculty member in the School of Education at SNHU in Fall of 2016.

Social Media: (Facebook)

DESCRIPTION

Black students are disciplined at a greater rate than students from any other ethnic group or race beginning in preschool. According to Fenning and Rose (2007), disparities in discipline rates have been a problem for over 30 years. Research indicates that racial issues may underlie disproportionate discipline rates (Saft & Pianta, 2001; Skiba et al., 2000; Chen, 2013). This session will present research from a doctoral dissertation examining the ways White teachers perceive and respond to student behavior based on race. Participants in the study were 125 White teachers from school districts in New England that reported disproportionate discipline rates. One interesting finding from this study was that there was a statistically significant difference in White teachers’ personal racial attitude scores based on the race of the student in the vignette that was presented to participants. Teachers who received the Black student vignette had more negative personal racial attitudes than teachers who received the White student vignette. This means that teachers’ personal racial attitudes may have been activated by reading the Black student vignette.
If White teachers’ personal racial attitudes were activated by seeing the image of the Black student and reading the accompanying vignette, it is possible that White teachers’ personal racial attitudes are also activated when they have a Black student in their classroom. This finding has implications for the field of education and the problem of disproportionate discipline rates. Another finding from this research study was that effective cultural competency training may help improve teacher attitudes. The implications findings from this study have for practice, as well as current research in the field, will be discussed. Using activities based upon the Kagan Model for Cooperative Learning, participants will self-reflect on their own beliefs and biases, use multiple lenses to review information shared by others, and collaborate in small and large groups to offer take-away strategies to disrupt inequity in education.
As a faculty member in a teacher education program, I believe it is important for individuals in the field of education to create more inclusive learning environments that meet the diverse needs of all student learners. This process requires ongoing self-reflection and acknowledgement of one’s own biases and stereotypical patterns to disrupt the perpetuation of inequities in education. Participants in this workshop will be provided with handouts that they can take back to utilize in their current positions, and strategies to help them work to disrupt inequity in the settings they are in.

Event Timeslots (3)

Tuesday, April 17
-
TUESDAY | CRYSTAL
This session will present research examining the ways White teachers perceive and respond to student behavior based on race. Findings from a study involving 125 White teachers from school districts in New England that reported disproportionate discipline rates will be presented. Participants in this session will self-reflect on their own beliefs and biases, use multiple lenses to review information shared by others, and collaborate to offer take-away strategies to disrupt inequity in education.

Crystal
-
TUESDAY | CRYSTAL
This session will present research examining the ways White teachers perceive and respond to student behavior based on race. Findings from a study involving 125 White teachers from school districts in New England that reported disproportionate discipline rates will be presented. Participants in this session will self-reflect on their own beliefs and biases, use multiple lenses to review information shared by others, and collaborate to offer take-away strategies to disrupt inequity in education.

Session 3 (Tuesday 1:30-2:45)
-
TUESDAY | CRYSTAL
This session will present research examining the ways White teachers perceive and respond to student behavior based on race. Findings from a study involving 125 White teachers from school districts in New England that reported disproportionate discipline rates will be presented. Participants in this session will self-reflect on their own beliefs and biases, use multiple lenses to review information shared by others, and collaborate to offer take-away strategies to disrupt inequity in education.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *