button-download-workshop-files Strand: Building a diverse workforce
Time: Tuesday, April 17, 2018 from 1:45 – 3:00 pm
Room: Roanoke

ABSTRACT

Youth apprenticeship is increasingly lauded as a debt-free path to higher education and high-wage jobs, particularly for students disproportionately barred from those opportunities. The burgeoning national landscape of programs provide little consensus on who youth apprenticeship is for. Can youth apprenticeship and similar approaches be paths to equity, or will they become the newest iteration of high school tracking? Join us for a presentation followed by small-group discussions.

PRESENTER(s)

aswisherPresenter 1

Abigail Swisher
Program Associate
New America

Biography: Abigail Swisher is a former public school STEM educator, and currently works for New America’s Education Policy Program, where she studies equitable and effective strategies for guaranteeing all students graduate from K-12 schools prepared for college and career.

bpartonPresenter 2

Brent Parton
Deputy Director, Center on Education and Skills
New America

Biography: Brent Parton is Deputy Director of New America’s Center on Education and Skills; prior to joining New America, Parton served at the United States Department of Labor as an advisor to the Secretary, and oversaw the design of a historic federal investment in apprenticeship expansion through states, communities, and industry organizations.

Presenter 3

Elena Silva, Ph.D.
Director, PreK-12 Education
New America

Biography: Elena Silva is the Director of PreK-12 Education within the Education Policy Program at New America, and also serves on the board of the NAPE Foundation.

DESCRIPTION

Youth apprenticeship is increasingly cited as a way provide a debt-free path to higher education and high-wage jobs, particularly for students disproportionately barred from those opportunities. Yet the average apprentices in the United States is disproportionately white, male, and far older than the average age of a ‘youth’ apprentice.The burgeoning national landscape of youth apprenticeship programs provides little consensus on who youth apprenticeship is for. Can youth apprenticeship be a path to greater equity, or will it become the newest iteration of high school tracking? New America has embarked upon a year-long research and listening project on issues of equity in youth apprenticeship to answer these and other important questions.
We will begin with a presentation that answers basic questions about what youth apprenticeship is, and how it is growing nationally. Our team will then present the results of a literature review which utilizes history and lessons from comparable workforce development strategies (such as adult apprenticeships or high school career academies) to frame where the charge to ensure equity in similarly programs has flourished or failed in the past. Participants will be provided a copy of New America’s literature review.
In the second half of the discussion, we will facilitate small-group discussions with session participants on the promise and pitfalls of expanding youth apprenticeship in today’s K-12 landscape. Participants will have an opportunity to engage in the early stages of this work and provide input into our future outreach efforts. These groups will be facilitated by our presenters, who will also provide a written discussion guide with room for notes. Given the emergent nature of this topic area, presenters will provide context and the opportunity for sharing among participants, but not necessarily advocate a single set of strategies or best practices.
The session will be presented and facilitated by a team of policy experts from New America. Brent Parton is Deputy Director of New America’s Center on Education and Skills; prior to joining New America, Parton served at the United States Department of Labor as an advisor to the Secretary, and oversaw the design of a historic federal investment in apprenticeship expansion through states, communities, and industry organizations. Elena Silva is the Director of PreK-12 Education within the Education Policy Program at New America, and also serves on the board of the NAPE Foundation. Abigail Swisher is a former public school STEM educator, and currently works for New America’s Education Policy Program, where she studies equitable and effective strategies for guaranteeing all students graduate from K-12 schools prepared for college and career.

Event Timeslots (4)

Tuesday, April 17
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TUESDAY | ROANOKE
Youth apprenticeship is increasingly lauded as a debt-free path to higher education and high-wage jobs, particularly for students disproportionately barred from those opportunities. The burgeoning national landscape of programs provide little consensus on who youth apprenticeship is for. Can youth apprenticeship and similar approaches be paths to equity, or will they become the newest iteration of high school tracking? Join us for a presentation followed by small-group discussions.

Roanoke
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TUESDAY | ROANOKE
Youth apprenticeship is increasingly lauded as a debt-free path to higher education and high-wage jobs, particularly for students disproportionately barred from those opportunities. The burgeoning national landscape of programs provide little consensus on who youth apprenticeship is for. Can youth apprenticeship and similar approaches be paths to equity, or will they become the newest iteration of high school tracking? Join us for a presentation followed by small-group discussions.

Session 3 (Tuesday 1:30-2:45)
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TUESDAY | ROANOKE
Youth apprenticeship is increasingly lauded as a debt-free path to higher education and high-wage jobs, particularly for students disproportionately barred from those opportunities. The burgeoning national landscape of programs provide little consensus on who youth apprenticeship is for. Can youth apprenticeship and similar approaches be paths to equity, or will they become the newest iteration of high school tracking? Join us for a presentation followed by small-group discussions.

Building a diverse workforce
-
TUESDAY | ROANOKE
Youth apprenticeship is increasingly lauded as a debt-free path to higher education and high-wage jobs, particularly for students disproportionately barred from those opportunities. The burgeoning national landscape of programs provide little consensus on who youth apprenticeship is for. Can youth apprenticeship and similar approaches be paths to equity, or will they become the newest iteration of high school tracking? Join us for a presentation followed by small-group discussions.

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