Youth Apprenticeship and the Equity Imperative

button-download-workshop-files Strand: Building a diverse workforce
Time: Tuesday, April 17, 2018 from 1:45 – 3:00 pm
Room: Roanoke

ABSTRACT

Youth apprenticeship is increasingly lauded as a debt-free path to higher education and high-wage jobs, particularly for students disproportionately barred from those opportunities. The burgeoning national landscape of programs provide little consensus on who youth apprenticeship is for. Can youth apprenticeship and similar approaches be paths to equity, or will they become the newest iteration of high school tracking? Join us for a presentation followed by small-group discussions.

PRESENTER(s)

aswisherPresenter 1

Abigail Swisher
Program Associate
New America

Biography: Abigail Swisher is a former public school STEM educator, and currently works for New America’s Education Policy Program, where she studies equitable and effective strategies for guaranteeing all students graduate from K-12 schools prepared for college and career.

bpartonPresenter 2

Brent Parton
Deputy Director, Center on Education and Skills
New America

Biography: Brent Parton is Deputy Director of New America’s Center on Education and Skills; prior to joining New America, Parton served at the United States Department of Labor as an advisor to the Secretary, and oversaw the design of a historic federal investment in apprenticeship expansion through states, communities, and industry organizations.

Presenter 3

Elena Silva, Ph.D.
Director, PreK-12 Education
New America

Biography: Elena Silva is the Director of PreK-12 Education within the Education Policy Program at New America, and also serves on the board of the NAPE Foundation.

DESCRIPTION

Youth apprenticeship is increasingly cited as a way provide a debt-free path to higher education and high-wage jobs, particularly for students disproportionately barred from those opportunities. Yet the average apprentices in the United States is disproportionately white, male, and far older than the average age of a ‘youth’ apprentice.The burgeoning national landscape of youth apprenticeship programs provides little consensus on who youth apprenticeship is for. Can youth apprenticeship be a path to greater equity, or will it become the newest iteration of high school tracking? New America has embarked upon a year-long research and listening project on issues of equity in youth apprenticeship to answer these and other important questions.
We will begin with a presentation that answers basic questions about what youth apprenticeship is, and how it is growing nationally. Our team will then present the results of a literature review which utilizes history and lessons from comparable workforce development strategies (such as adult apprenticeships or high school career academies) to frame where the charge to ensure equity in similarly programs has flourished or failed in the past. Participants will be provided a copy of New America’s literature review.
In the second half of the discussion, we will facilitate small-group discussions with session participants on the promise and pitfalls of expanding youth apprenticeship in today’s K-12 landscape. Participants will have an opportunity to engage in the early stages of this work and provide input into our future outreach efforts. These groups will be facilitated by our presenters, who will also provide a written discussion guide with room for notes. Given the emergent nature of this topic area, presenters will provide context and the opportunity for sharing among participants, but not necessarily advocate a single set of strategies or best practices.
The session will be presented and facilitated by a team of policy experts from New America. Brent Parton is Deputy Director of New America’s Center on Education and Skills; prior to joining New America, Parton served at the United States Department of Labor as an advisor to the Secretary, and oversaw the design of a historic federal investment in apprenticeship expansion through states, communities, and industry organizations. Elena Silva is the Director of PreK-12 Education within the Education Policy Program at New America, and also serves on the board of the NAPE Foundation. Abigail Swisher is a former public school STEM educator, and currently works for New America’s Education Policy Program, where she studies equitable and effective strategies for guaranteeing all students graduate from K-12 schools prepared for college and career.

NSF’s Advanced Technological Education Program: Funding Innovative Equity Initiatives at Community Colleges

button-download-workshop-filesStrand: Building a diverse workforce
Time: Tuesday, April 17, 2018 from 10:45 – 12:00 pm
Room: Crystal

ABSTRACT

The National Science Foundation (NSF) Advanced Technological Education (ATE) program provides grants to develop America’s technician workforce for advanced technologies through two-year workforce education programs at community and technical colleges. This session will present an overview of the NSF ATE program, outline the process for developing a grant proposal, tips for developing a competitive proposal, and highlight current grants that are focused on underrepresented populations.

PRESENTER(s)

mbargerPresenter 1

Marilyn Barger, Ph.D.
Executive Director
FLATE

Biography: Dr. Marilyn Barger is the Principal Investigator and Executive Director of FLATE, the Florida Advanced Technological Education Center of Excellence, funded by the National Science Foundation and housed at Hillsborough Community College in Tampa, Florida. FLATE serves manufacturing education in Florida is involved in student recruitment for technical career pathways; has produced award-winning curriculum and secondary and post-secondary reform initiatives for Career Education programs; and offers professional development for STEM and CTE educators in advanced technologies. She has a special interest in recruiting girls into STEM careers. Dr. Barger has a Ph.D. in Civil/Environmental Engineering from the University of South Florida, which designed membrane separation systems for water purification. She has a licensed patent and is a Florida registered professional engineer. Dr. Barger has over 20 years’ experience in developing and delivering K20 engineering and technical curriculum.

dlangePresenter 2

Donna Lange
DeafTEC Director and PI
RIT/NTID

Biography: Donna Lange has been teaching deaf and hard-of-hearing students in Associate-level programs for close to 30 years at the National Technical Institute for the Deaf (NTID), one of the nine colleges of the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) in Rochester, NY. She is an associate professor and former chair of the Applied Computer Technology Department and has taught a variety of computer-related courses in the areas of both hardware and web development. Lange is currently the PI and Center Director of the NSF ATE National Center of Excellence, DeafTEC: Technological Education Center for Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students (www.deaftec.org) that was established at RIT/NTID in 2011. She holds a BS in Computer Science from SUNY Brockport and an MS degree in Software Development and Management from RIT.

DESCRIPTION

The NSF’s Advanced Technological Education Program: Funding Innovation at Community Colleges presentation will allow conference attendees the opportunity to become familiar with the NSF ATE program to fund innovative equity initiatives in STEM at their colleges.

The presentation will cover:
• A general overview of the NSF ATE program
• The process for developing a grant proposal
• Tips for developing a competitive proposal
• Support for writing ATE grant proposals including information on the ATE
Mentor Connect project that offers new grant writers assistance in
preparing ATE grant proposals
• Select ATE projects/Centers that focus on equity and underrepresented
populations such as DeafTEC, EESTEM, FLATE