Supporting Students with ASD as they Transition to College and the Workforce

button-download-workshop-files Strand: Best practices for equitable learning environments
Time: Tuesday, April 17, 2018 from 1:45 – 3:00 pm
Room: Richmond

ABSTRACT

As the number of students diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) continues to rise, many students with ASD are now entering college and the workplace. Participants will be able to recognize when interacting with a student with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), describe the characteristics of student with ASD: what it looks like in the college setting and identify strategies that can be used to help students on the autism spectrum succeed and transition to college and/or the workplace.

PRESENTER(s)

ajulianPresenter 1

Aimee Julian, Ph.D.
Director
Illinois Center for Specialized Professional Support

Biography: Aime´e Julian, PhD is the Director of the Illinois Center for Specialized Professional Support (ICSPS) at Illinois State University. ICSPS provides technical assistance, develops publications, and facilitates program improvement strategies for our partners as they relate to equity, college transition, recruitment, retention, and completion−encouraging achievement of special populations learners. Aimee creates, supports, and delivers professional development for career and technical education professionals across Illinois. She has 17 year experience working extensively with the implementation of the Perkins legislation through the Illinois Community College Board, the Illinois State Board of Education, and in her current position at ICSPS. Aimee is an experienced lecturer and facilitator working to build capacity for understanding of Programs of Study, Career Pathways and the importance of partnerships.

Presenter 2

nmichalakNikki Michalak
ATTA Project Coordinator
Illinois Center for Specialized Professional Support

Biography: Nikki Michalak has worked in special education for over 13 years. Nikki strives to facilitate success for special education administrators, staff, and students by providing access to information and tools specifically designed to support student s with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Her goal is to understand the needs and challenges of educators working with individuals with ASD and be a relevant resource while empowering staff and students to succeed. Nikki continues to provide professional learning, technical assistance, coaching and consultation to educators, and families of individuals and youth with ASD. She co-created online professional development as well as under graduate and graduate courses on ASD. Ms. Michalak publishes in the field of ASD and informs local service provision through service on multiple leadership boards.

DESCRIPTION

This presentation will showcase the Autism Training and Technical Assistance Project (ATTA) which seeks to develop and present resources that assist individuals with Autism in their transition from secondary education to postsecondary education or employment. This session will also provide training and support to important stakeholders (secondary and postsecondary educators, community members, family members and employers) as they work to provide an equitable experience for individuals with autism.

The Autism Training and Technical Assistance Project (ATTA) is accessible via a web portal which is located at http://autismcollegeandcareer.com/. The presenters have created this project for the state of Illinois to assist students with Autism as they transition to postsecondary and the workplace.

Resources that will be shared include:
– student self-assessment to be completed by the student/young adult with ASD
– workplace/environment assessment
– tips for faculty on working with students with ASD
– evidence based practices for ASD
– why should I hire someone with ASD
– getting the best out of your employee with ASD

This session will be engaging, and provide hands on exploration of what ASD looks like in your classroom, building or workplace. During this session participants will learn how to recognize when interacting with a student with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), the presenters will describe the characteristics of student with ASD, and the session will explore what ASD looks like in the college setting. Moreover, participants will learn strategies that can be used to help students on the autism spectrum succeed and transition to college and/or the workplace.

Youth Apprenticeship and the Equity Imperative

button-download-workshop-files Strand: Building a diverse workforce
Time: Tuesday, April 17, 2018 from 1:45 – 3:00 pm
Room: Roanoke

ABSTRACT

Youth apprenticeship is increasingly lauded as a debt-free path to higher education and high-wage jobs, particularly for students disproportionately barred from those opportunities. The burgeoning national landscape of programs provide little consensus on who youth apprenticeship is for. Can youth apprenticeship and similar approaches be paths to equity, or will they become the newest iteration of high school tracking? Join us for a presentation followed by small-group discussions.

PRESENTER(s)

aswisherPresenter 1

Abigail Swisher
Program Associate
New America

Biography: Abigail Swisher is a former public school STEM educator, and currently works for New America’s Education Policy Program, where she studies equitable and effective strategies for guaranteeing all students graduate from K-12 schools prepared for college and career.

bpartonPresenter 2

Brent Parton
Deputy Director, Center on Education and Skills
New America

Biography: Brent Parton is Deputy Director of New America’s Center on Education and Skills; prior to joining New America, Parton served at the United States Department of Labor as an advisor to the Secretary, and oversaw the design of a historic federal investment in apprenticeship expansion through states, communities, and industry organizations.

Presenter 3

Elena Silva, Ph.D.
Director, PreK-12 Education
New America

Biography: Elena Silva is the Director of PreK-12 Education within the Education Policy Program at New America, and also serves on the board of the NAPE Foundation.

DESCRIPTION

Youth apprenticeship is increasingly cited as a way provide a debt-free path to higher education and high-wage jobs, particularly for students disproportionately barred from those opportunities. Yet the average apprentices in the United States is disproportionately white, male, and far older than the average age of a ‘youth’ apprentice.The burgeoning national landscape of youth apprenticeship programs provides little consensus on who youth apprenticeship is for. Can youth apprenticeship be a path to greater equity, or will it become the newest iteration of high school tracking? New America has embarked upon a year-long research and listening project on issues of equity in youth apprenticeship to answer these and other important questions.
We will begin with a presentation that answers basic questions about what youth apprenticeship is, and how it is growing nationally. Our team will then present the results of a literature review which utilizes history and lessons from comparable workforce development strategies (such as adult apprenticeships or high school career academies) to frame where the charge to ensure equity in similarly programs has flourished or failed in the past. Participants will be provided a copy of New America’s literature review.
In the second half of the discussion, we will facilitate small-group discussions with session participants on the promise and pitfalls of expanding youth apprenticeship in today’s K-12 landscape. Participants will have an opportunity to engage in the early stages of this work and provide input into our future outreach efforts. These groups will be facilitated by our presenters, who will also provide a written discussion guide with room for notes. Given the emergent nature of this topic area, presenters will provide context and the opportunity for sharing among participants, but not necessarily advocate a single set of strategies or best practices.
The session will be presented and facilitated by a team of policy experts from New America. Brent Parton is Deputy Director of New America’s Center on Education and Skills; prior to joining New America, Parton served at the United States Department of Labor as an advisor to the Secretary, and oversaw the design of a historic federal investment in apprenticeship expansion through states, communities, and industry organizations. Elena Silva is the Director of PreK-12 Education within the Education Policy Program at New America, and also serves on the board of the NAPE Foundation. Abigail Swisher is a former public school STEM educator, and currently works for New America’s Education Policy Program, where she studies equitable and effective strategies for guaranteeing all students graduate from K-12 schools prepared for college and career.

Automation and Policies to Create Equitable Access to Jobs of the Future

button-download-workshop-filesStrand: Public Policy—Supporting Equity and Education
Time: Tuesday, April 17, 2018 from 1:45 – 3:00 pm
Room: Yorktown

ABSTRACT

Digitalization, artificial intelligence, and automation are projected to impact a large number of occupations in the coming decades. This session will review the threats and opportunities posed by automation to different groups of women. It will then discuss how automation and gender equitable access to CTE and workforce development fits into current federal policy discussions, from Perkins to apprenticeship policy.

PRESENTER(s)

ahegewischPresenter 1

Ariane Hegewisch, MPhil
Program Director Employment & Earnings
Institute for Women’s Policy Research

Biography: Ariane Hegewisch is Program Director for Employment and Earnings at the Institute for Women’s Policy Research, an independent research institute in Washington, DC. She is responsible for IWPR’s research on earnings, occupations, and workplace discrimination, and directs IWPR’s work for the U.S. Department of Labor’s Gender Equity in Apprenticeship grant, and co-directs IWPR’s program on Women and the Future of Work. Recent publications include Pathways to Equity: Narrowing the Wage Gap by Improving Women’s Access to Good Middle-Skill Jobs. She was a member of the 2015-2016 EEOC’s Select Taskforce on Workplace Harassment. Prior to coming to the USA in 2001, she taught European human resource management at Cranfield School of Management in the UK. She began her career in London as a policy advisor on sector strategies and women’s employment and training. She received a BSc Economics from the London School of Economics, and an MPhil Development Studies from the University of Sussex, UK.

Social Media: (Twitter)(Facebook)

kspikerPresenter 2

Katie Spiker
Senior Federal Policy Analyst
National Skills Coalition

Biography: Katie Spiker is Senior Federal Policy Analyst with National Skills Coalition, working to advance NSC’s Washington-based policy efforts through federal legislation, agency regulation and national funding initiatives related to workforce, postsecondary education, and human services polices. In coordination with NSC field staff, she assists local leaders. Prior to joining NSC in 2015, she was the Associate Director of the National Center for Women’s Employment Equity, providing on-site and virtual technical assistance to improve women’s access to nontraditional occupations. Katie has also consulted with the Institute for Women’s Policy Research and the National Women’s Law Center and held positions at Workplace Flexibility 2010 and the National Partnership for Women and Families. Katie is a 2015 Ford Foundation Public Voices Fellow. She holds a J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center and a bachelor’s degree from the University of Miami.

Social Media: (Twitter)(Facebook)

DESCRIPTION

Since the early 2000s, automation, artificial intelligence, and digitalization have spread rapidly, eliminating some jobs and changing the nature of work in others while also increasing the returns to digital skill; these trends are projected to accelerate substantially during the coming decades (see for example Autor 2015, Frey and Osbourne 2013, Manyika et al. 2017a,b; Muro et al. 2017). The World Economic Forum’s recent analysis of U.S. trends suggests that the majority of workers who may have to change jobs will be women (World Economic Forum 2018). Because women and men tend to work in different occupations and economic sectors and differ in the extent to which they take on family care responsibilities, technological changes pose different threats and opportunities for women than men.

Drawing on the Institute for Women’s Policy Research’s Women and the Future of Work project, this panel will provide an overview of research on the impact of automation on employment, focusing on likely impacts of new technology on the largest occupations and sectors in which women work, showing that threats are particularly pronounced in many administrative and professional middle-skill jobs which used to provide good middle-class earning opportunities. It will highlight the threats and opportunities posed by technological changes to women of different racial and ethnic background, and of different ages.

The session will then turn to Capitol Hill and responses by federal policymakers to the challenges posed by automation and digitalization. Katie Spiker of the National Skill Coalition will discuss how automation and digitalization and its gendered impact fit into ongoing workforce and educational debates around Perkins Act Reauthorization, the promotion of apprenticeships, and related initiatives.

Congress is working to reauthorize the Higher Education Act, the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act, and the Farm bill. Apprenticeship remains a bipartisan buzzword in DC. The administration has identified welfare reform as an area in which they will focus. And as Congress struggles to reach bipartisan agreement on budget and funding levels for the current or future years, those negotiations have become a constant backdrop to authorizing activity.

Automation offers an opportunity and a challenge for these policy discussions. As technology and jobs change, it is more important than ever that our policies support the kind of training that allow workers to build and upgrade their skills in response to these changes.

Participants in this session will come away with an awareness of the major studies and methodologies used for estimating the impact of automation and digitalization on employment, and will get an understanding of the areas of women’s work that are most likely to be impacted. The session will provide participants with an understanding of a who’s who and what’s what on automation, CTE, and workforce development debates on the Hill. The session will end with a discussion on how we can increase the gender awareness of policymakers in relation to pending technological disruption.

Participants in this session will come away with an awareness of the major studies and methodologies used for estimating the impact of automation and digitalization on employment, and will get an understanding of the areas of women’s work that are most likely to be impacted. The session will provide participants with an understanding of a who’s who and what’s what on automation, CTE, and workforce development debates on the Hill. The session will end with a discussion on how we can increase the gender awareness of policymakers in relation to pending technological disruption.

References
Autor, David. 2015. “Why are there still so many Jobs? The History and Future of Workplace Automation.” Journal of Economic Perspectives (29:3)3-30
Muro, Mark, Sifan Liu, Jacob Whiton, and Siddharth Kulkarni. 2017. Digitalization and the American Workforce. Washington DC: Brookings Metropolitan Policy Program. <https://www.brookings.edu/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/mpp_2017nov15_digitalization_full_report.pdf>
Manyika , James, Susan Lund, Michael Chui, Jacques Bughin , Jonathan Woetzel, Parul Batra, Ryan Ko, Saurabh Sanghvi . 2017. Jobs Lost, Jobs Gained: Workforce Transitions in a time of automation. McKinsey Institute; December
World Economic Forum. 2018. Towards a Reskilling Revolution A Future of Jobs for All Geneva: World Economic Forum <http://www3.weforum.org/docs/WEF_FOW_Reskilling_Revolution.pdf> (accessed January 23, 2018)

It Takes a Village to Create High Tech Pathways

button-download-workshop-filesStrand: Increasing access and equity in CTE and STEM
Time: Tuesday, April 17, 2018 from 1:45 – 3:00 pm
Room: Monroe

ABSTRACT

The lack of diversity in the tech industry has generated significant attention in recent years. We’ll explore the underrepresentation of African Americans in high tech careers, along with “the pipeline problem,” a commonly cited reason for this occurrence. We’ll also discuss other explanations grounded in statistics, social science research, and anecdotal insight. Participants will brainstorm opportunities to create pathways to high tech to inform professional practices of industry leaders.

PRESENTER(s)

covertonPresenter 1

Cynthia Overton, Ph.D.
Principal Researcher
American Institutes for Research

Biography: Cynthia Overton, Ph.D., is a principal researcher with American Institutes for Research (AIR) where she leads projects and tasks designed to enhance opportunities and outcomes for underrepresented populations. She is also an expert in knowledge translation—an approach that engages consumers throughout the research process to make findings user-friendly. In addition, Dr. Overton has been engaged with diversity and inclusion initiatives at AIR for the past 10 years. She is also the founder of inclusionclearinghouse.org, an online repository of resources related to diversity inclusion in high tech. She’s conducted dozens of listening sessions with high tech professionals, non-profits leaders, and policymakers on diversity inclusion in tech. Dr. Overton holds masters and doctoral degrees in educational technology from the University of Michigan; a masters degree in PR/corporate communications from Georgetown University; and teaching credentials from Eastern Michigan University.

Social Media: (LinkedIN)(Facebook)

cmoorePresenter 2

Cherise Moore, Ph.D.
Senior Researcher
American Institutes for Research

Biography: Cherise G. Moore, Ph.D., is a senior researcher at American Institutes for Research (AIR). Dr. Moore leads national and state-level projects related to adult learning and career pathways. She provides leadership on career preparation and advancement, representing AIR in the field with CTE and career pathways educators and business and industry stakeholders. Dr. Moore is the deputy director for the Nevada Adult Education and Family Literacy Act (AEFLA) Leadership Professional Training Project and leads CALPRO project work related to administrative leadership training. Prior to AIR, Dr. Moore served as a practitioner in a southern California school district in adult and career and technical education. She holds a Ph.D. in Public Administration and a M.A. in Educational Administration and Leadership from Arizona State University. She also received a M.A. in Urban Planning and B.A. in Political Science from the University of California, Los Angeles.

Social Media: (Facebook)

DESCRIPTION

The lack of diversity in high tech careers has generated significant attention in recent years. An analysis of EEO-1 data found that compared to private industry, the high tech sector employs a larger share of whites (63.5 percent to 68.5 percent) and Asian Americans (5.8 percent to 14 percent) and a lower share of African Americans (14.4 percent to 7.4 percent) (EEOC, 2016). The lack of diversity in Silicon Valley’s tech workforce is much more extreme, which consists of less than 5 percent African Americans. In response to this, the tech sector has initiated a host of strategies such as incentivizing recruiters to identify a more diverse talent pool of candidates, creating talent development and pipeline recruitment programs that engage underrepresented minorities, and hiring corporate diversity and inclusion leaders. However, significant opportunity exists for parents, teachers, counselors, professors and other stakeholders that serve a critical role in the upbringing, education, and character development of potential technology professionals to offer input to tech companies on creating a more diverse workforce. This session will offer such a platform to generate innovative ideas that serve to enhance diversity throughout high tech.

This presentation will involve an open discussion about the underrepresentation of African Americans in high tech careers. It will begin by exploring one of the most commonly cited reasons for the lack of diversity in high tech—a “pipeline problem.” The discussion will then address alternatives to the “pipeline problem” school of thought that are grounded in statistics, social science research, and anecdotal insight to help participants think deeper about the issue, including: graduation trends from computer science programs; student confidence; geographic location of underrepresented populations; limited social capital among underrepresented minorities; lack of exposure to pathways in technology or the “information gap; and unconscious bias.

The session will then discuss existing strategies that provide industry training and immersive experiences to underrepresented minorities such as talent development and pipeline recruitment programs offered through, schools, nonprofits, and the technology sector. Participants will be given a handout with a URL and QR code that will take them to https://inclusionclearinghouse.org a website that offers resources on opportunities for people from underrepresented populations to pursue careers in high tech.

Next, participants engage in a “Voices from the Village” activity, which will involve working in small groups to engage in a brainstorming activity to develop insights and actionable strategies that can help enhance diversity inclusion in high tech. One set of strategies will be designed for the high tech community, while the other set of strategies will be designed for the “village” or community of teachers, counselors, professors, and others that have a significant role in shaping the development of youth as they prepare for adulthood and the possibility of careers in high tech. Participants will be given a brainstorming and reporting template to support this process.

Following the brainstorming session, participants will reconvene with the larger group to report out highlights of their discussion. If time permits, others will be given the opportunity to give input on group suggestions to build on ideas. Participants will then be asked to submit their written synopsis to facilitators. After the conference, the facilitators will synthesize information and package it in a user-friendly document.

To promote the utilization of ideas generated through the session, presenters will disseminate the document to diversity inclusion leaders at various high tech companies to help inform their professional practices as they design and implement initiatives to increase the number of underrepresented minorities entering high tech. Facilitators will also post the information on www.inclusionclearinghouse.org so that it can be accessed and used by educators and other practitioners in the K-12 and post-secondary environments.

This session will be led by Cynthia Overton, Ph.D. and Cherise Moore, Ph.D. Dr. Overton has conducted more than two dozen listening sessions with high tech professionals, non-profits leaders, and policymakers on diversity inclusion in tech, has 12 years of AIR experience working on projects that improve outcomes for underrepresented populations; holds a doctorate in educational technology; is a former teacher in urban school system; serves as a board member for Quality Education for Minorities Network; and is the founder of inclusionclearinghouse.org. Dr. More has presented multiple sessions related to career pathways and CTE; is founder and coordinator for the African-American College Planning Conference; has six years of experience at AIR working on projects that improve outcomes for adult learners and underrepresented populations; is a former public school teacher and school administrator; and currently serves as a high school district school board member.

SciGirls Strategies: Gender Equitable Teaching Strategies for High School STEM and CTE Educators

button-download-workshop-filesStrand: Increasing access and equity in CTE and STEM
Time: Tuesday, April 17, 2018 from 1:45 – 3:00 pm
Room: Williamsburg

ABSTRACT

Want to motivate and inspire more girls to consider non-traditional careers in STEM and the trades? Learn how to use research-based gender equity strategies to spark girls’ futures!

PRESENTER(s)

bbritschPresenter 1

Brenda Britsch, Ph.D.
Senior Research Scientist
SciGirls

Biography: Brenda Britsch is a Senior Research Scientist with the National Girls Collaborative Project, a national initiative aimed at increasing equity in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). Brenda believes in the potential of research to transform practice and works to make research accessible to a broad audience of educators and other professionals working to diversify the STEM pipeline.

Dr. Britsch has been working with SciGirls for over ten years, changing the way millions of girls think about STEM. As a principal investigator on the SciGirls Strategies project, Brenda has created curriculum and overseen project implementation which, to date, has helped 49 educators create more gender equitable classrooms.

Social Media: (Twitter)(Facebook)

ldefenbaughPresenter 2

Leah Defenbaugh
STEM Outreach Manager
SciGirls

Biography: Leah Defenbaugh manages local outreach efforts for students, parents, and educators. She organizes and executes trainings for educators and STEM professionals, and implements SciGirls programming in formal and informal learning spaces, including after school programs, schools, and museums. She previously lead youth program initiatives at the YMCA of Greater Minnesota and the Boys and Girls Clubs of Milwaukee.

Social Media: (Twitter)(Facebook)

Presenter 3

Alex Dexheimer
Senior STEM Coordinator
SciGirls

Biography: Alex Dexheimer has seven years of experience working in formal and informal K-12 education where he has promoted gender equity in STEM/CTE classrooms through professional development and classroom activities.

Social Media: (Twitter)(Facebook)

DESCRIPTION

SciGirls Strategies: Gender Equitable Teaching Practices in Career and Technical Education Pathways for High School Girls is a three-year professional development initiative developed by Twin Cities Public Television (TPT) to help career and technical education (CTE) educators and guidance counselors recruit and retain more girls in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) pathways, specifically in technology and engineering. SciGirls Strategies includes a media-rich hybrid professional development short-course for CTE teachers and guidance counselors in the use of gender equitable and culturally responsive teaching and advising strategies. In addition to the course, the participating high school educators and counselors are connected to female STEM role models recruited by local STEM industry partners and project advisors and are required to incorporate role models into their classes or school events. The role models are trained on research-based practices for role models and effective strategies for encouraging girls in STEM. TPT also produced a series of 12 short-form role model videos featuring diverse female technology, engineering, and CTE professionals for use by counselors, educators, girls and families. These Regional Emmy Award-winning videos feature the women at work and at home, describing their challenges and successes.

This interactive session will be led by SciGirls Strategies Principal Investigators and Senior Personnel who have decades of experience in the equity in STEM field, specifically in developing and delivering high-quality professional development to educators focused on gender equitable and culturally responsive strategies. The session will focus on the course itself and the impact of the course on participating educators and counselors, with a particular emphasis on educators’ and counselors’ integration of role models (live and video) into their schools and classrooms. Presenters will share details of the course design and content, including how the course was revised throughout the three years based on facilitator and student feedback and evaluation findings. Significant learning and revision occurred throughout the three iterations of the course resulting ultimately in a resource-rich hybrid (face-to-face and online) experience that focuses on each participating teacher or counselor’s strengths and provides the opportunity and support for them to grow in the areas they select based on a comprehensive self-assessment.

Presenters will share a variety of resources utilized throughout the SciGirls Strategies project, including relevant research articles and engaging online content, as well as resources and materials developed specifically for the project. Presenters will also share the process for recruiting and training female STEM role models for the project and how participating educators incorporated these role models into their classes. Session participants will also view and discuss a selection of the role model videos developed for SciGirls Strategies that feature female STEM role models working in a variety of fields and are available online at no cost.

Teacher Identity and Attitudes: Strategies for Disrupting Inequity in Education

button-download-workshop-filesStrand: Best practices for equitable learning environments
Time: Tuesday, April 17, 2018 from 1:45 – 3:00 pm
Room: Crystal

ABSTRACT

This session will present research examining the ways White teachers perceive and respond to student behavior based on race. Findings from a study involving 125 White teachers from school districts in New England that reported disproportionate discipline rates will be presented. Participants in this session will self-reflect on their own beliefs and biases, use multiple lenses to review information shared by others, and collaborate to offer take-away strategies to disrupt inequity in education.

PRESENTER(s)

ctapleyPresenter 1

Colleen Tapley, Ed.D.
Assistant Professor, Program Coordinator for Undergraduate and Graduate Special Education
Southern New Hampshire University

Biography: Colleen Tapley received her doctorate in Leadership and Learning from Rivier University in May of 2016. She has over 16 years experience in the field of education with experience in special education, elementary education, middle school, and administration. Tapley has a strong background in curriculum development and a focus on preparing teachers to implement STEM and LEGO Robotics in grades K-6. Her doctoral dissertation examined the ways White teachers perceive and respond to student behavior based on racial identity status and racial attitudes. Tapley also has experience developing and implementing trainings to improve educators’ cultural competency. She recently presented a session called “Who Am I? Exploring Learner Identity and Biases to Disrupt Inequity in Education” at the 2017 Learner Research Network international conference at the University of Hawaii. Tapley became a full time faculty member in the School of Education at SNHU in Fall of 2016.

Social Media: (Facebook)

DESCRIPTION

Black students are disciplined at a greater rate than students from any other ethnic group or race beginning in preschool. According to Fenning and Rose (2007), disparities in discipline rates have been a problem for over 30 years. Research indicates that racial issues may underlie disproportionate discipline rates (Saft & Pianta, 2001; Skiba et al., 2000; Chen, 2013). This session will present research from a doctoral dissertation examining the ways White teachers perceive and respond to student behavior based on race. Participants in the study were 125 White teachers from school districts in New England that reported disproportionate discipline rates. One interesting finding from this study was that there was a statistically significant difference in White teachers’ personal racial attitude scores based on the race of the student in the vignette that was presented to participants. Teachers who received the Black student vignette had more negative personal racial attitudes than teachers who received the White student vignette. This means that teachers’ personal racial attitudes may have been activated by reading the Black student vignette.
If White teachers’ personal racial attitudes were activated by seeing the image of the Black student and reading the accompanying vignette, it is possible that White teachers’ personal racial attitudes are also activated when they have a Black student in their classroom. This finding has implications for the field of education and the problem of disproportionate discipline rates. Another finding from this research study was that effective cultural competency training may help improve teacher attitudes. The implications findings from this study have for practice, as well as current research in the field, will be discussed. Using activities based upon the Kagan Model for Cooperative Learning, participants will self-reflect on their own beliefs and biases, use multiple lenses to review information shared by others, and collaborate in small and large groups to offer take-away strategies to disrupt inequity in education.
As a faculty member in a teacher education program, I believe it is important for individuals in the field of education to create more inclusive learning environments that meet the diverse needs of all student learners. This process requires ongoing self-reflection and acknowledgement of one’s own biases and stereotypical patterns to disrupt the perpetuation of inequities in education. Participants in this workshop will be provided with handouts that they can take back to utilize in their current positions, and strategies to help them work to disrupt inequity in the settings they are in.