Automation and Policies to Create Equitable Access to Jobs of the Future

button-download-workshop-filesStrand: Public Policy—Supporting Equity and Education
Time: Tuesday, April 17, 2018 from 1:45 – 3:00 pm
Room: Yorktown

ABSTRACT

Digitalization, artificial intelligence, and automation are projected to impact a large number of occupations in the coming decades. This session will review the threats and opportunities posed by automation to different groups of women. It will then discuss how automation and gender equitable access to CTE and workforce development fits into current federal policy discussions, from Perkins to apprenticeship policy.

PRESENTER(s)

ahegewischPresenter 1

Ariane Hegewisch, MPhil
Program Director Employment & Earnings
Institute for Women’s Policy Research

Biography: Ariane Hegewisch is Program Director for Employment and Earnings at the Institute for Women’s Policy Research, an independent research institute in Washington, DC. She is responsible for IWPR’s research on earnings, occupations, and workplace discrimination, and directs IWPR’s work for the U.S. Department of Labor’s Gender Equity in Apprenticeship grant, and co-directs IWPR’s program on Women and the Future of Work. Recent publications include Pathways to Equity: Narrowing the Wage Gap by Improving Women’s Access to Good Middle-Skill Jobs. She was a member of the 2015-2016 EEOC’s Select Taskforce on Workplace Harassment. Prior to coming to the USA in 2001, she taught European human resource management at Cranfield School of Management in the UK. She began her career in London as a policy advisor on sector strategies and women’s employment and training. She received a BSc Economics from the London School of Economics, and an MPhil Development Studies from the University of Sussex, UK.

Social Media: (Twitter)(Facebook)

kspikerPresenter 2

Katie Spiker
Senior Federal Policy Analyst
National Skills Coalition

Biography: Katie Spiker is Senior Federal Policy Analyst with National Skills Coalition, working to advance NSC’s Washington-based policy efforts through federal legislation, agency regulation and national funding initiatives related to workforce, postsecondary education, and human services polices. In coordination with NSC field staff, she assists local leaders. Prior to joining NSC in 2015, she was the Associate Director of the National Center for Women’s Employment Equity, providing on-site and virtual technical assistance to improve women’s access to nontraditional occupations. Katie has also consulted with the Institute for Women’s Policy Research and the National Women’s Law Center and held positions at Workplace Flexibility 2010 and the National Partnership for Women and Families. Katie is a 2015 Ford Foundation Public Voices Fellow. She holds a J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center and a bachelor’s degree from the University of Miami.

Social Media: (Twitter)(Facebook)

DESCRIPTION

Since the early 2000s, automation, artificial intelligence, and digitalization have spread rapidly, eliminating some jobs and changing the nature of work in others while also increasing the returns to digital skill; these trends are projected to accelerate substantially during the coming decades (see for example Autor 2015, Frey and Osbourne 2013, Manyika et al. 2017a,b; Muro et al. 2017). The World Economic Forum’s recent analysis of U.S. trends suggests that the majority of workers who may have to change jobs will be women (World Economic Forum 2018). Because women and men tend to work in different occupations and economic sectors and differ in the extent to which they take on family care responsibilities, technological changes pose different threats and opportunities for women than men.

Drawing on the Institute for Women’s Policy Research’s Women and the Future of Work project, this panel will provide an overview of research on the impact of automation on employment, focusing on likely impacts of new technology on the largest occupations and sectors in which women work, showing that threats are particularly pronounced in many administrative and professional middle-skill jobs which used to provide good middle-class earning opportunities. It will highlight the threats and opportunities posed by technological changes to women of different racial and ethnic background, and of different ages.

The session will then turn to Capitol Hill and responses by federal policymakers to the challenges posed by automation and digitalization. Katie Spiker of the National Skill Coalition will discuss how automation and digitalization and its gendered impact fit into ongoing workforce and educational debates around Perkins Act Reauthorization, the promotion of apprenticeships, and related initiatives.

Congress is working to reauthorize the Higher Education Act, the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act, and the Farm bill. Apprenticeship remains a bipartisan buzzword in DC. The administration has identified welfare reform as an area in which they will focus. And as Congress struggles to reach bipartisan agreement on budget and funding levels for the current or future years, those negotiations have become a constant backdrop to authorizing activity.

Automation offers an opportunity and a challenge for these policy discussions. As technology and jobs change, it is more important than ever that our policies support the kind of training that allow workers to build and upgrade their skills in response to these changes.

Participants in this session will come away with an awareness of the major studies and methodologies used for estimating the impact of automation and digitalization on employment, and will get an understanding of the areas of women’s work that are most likely to be impacted. The session will provide participants with an understanding of a who’s who and what’s what on automation, CTE, and workforce development debates on the Hill. The session will end with a discussion on how we can increase the gender awareness of policymakers in relation to pending technological disruption.

Participants in this session will come away with an awareness of the major studies and methodologies used for estimating the impact of automation and digitalization on employment, and will get an understanding of the areas of women’s work that are most likely to be impacted. The session will provide participants with an understanding of a who’s who and what’s what on automation, CTE, and workforce development debates on the Hill. The session will end with a discussion on how we can increase the gender awareness of policymakers in relation to pending technological disruption.

References
Autor, David. 2015. “Why are there still so many Jobs? The History and Future of Workplace Automation.” Journal of Economic Perspectives (29:3)3-30
Muro, Mark, Sifan Liu, Jacob Whiton, and Siddharth Kulkarni. 2017. Digitalization and the American Workforce. Washington DC: Brookings Metropolitan Policy Program. <https://www.brookings.edu/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/mpp_2017nov15_digitalization_full_report.pdf>
Manyika , James, Susan Lund, Michael Chui, Jacques Bughin , Jonathan Woetzel, Parul Batra, Ryan Ko, Saurabh Sanghvi . 2017. Jobs Lost, Jobs Gained: Workforce Transitions in a time of automation. McKinsey Institute; December
World Economic Forum. 2018. Towards a Reskilling Revolution A Future of Jobs for All Geneva: World Economic Forum <http://www3.weforum.org/docs/WEF_FOW_Reskilling_Revolution.pdf> (accessed January 23, 2018)

Data Matters: Transparent Data to Advance Equity

button-download-workshop-filesStrand: Public Policy—Supporting Equity and Education
Time: Tuesday, April 17, 2018 from 9:15 – 10:30 am
Room: Yorktown

ABSTRACT

There are significant gaps in our information about post-secondary education and training. We do not know how much students earn after graduating from a program of study or how many are employed. We do not know how these outcomes vary by race/ethnicity, gender, or other student characteristics. This session will discuss the College Transparency Act that would amend the Higher Education Act to provide such information, and how this information would advance efforts to achieve equity.

PRESENTER(s)

Presenter 1

Bryan Wilson, Ph.D.
Director
Workforce Data Quality Campaign

Biography: Bryan Wilson directs Workforce Data Quality Campaign (WDQC), a project of National Skills Coalition (NSC). WDQC advocates for aligned, inclusive, and relevant data systems which inform education and training policies that prepare all Americans for a skilled workforce and support the nation’s economic growth. Previously, Bryan was State Policy Director for NSC, leading NSC’s efforts to assist state-based coalitions and policymakers in the development of specific policy proposals, including providing in-depth analyses of model state policies and proposals. He joined NSC in 2013.

Prior to joining NSC, Bryan was the Deputy Director of the Washington State Workforce Training and Education Coordinating Board, overseeing policy, legislative activities, research, and performance accountability. He holds a doctorate in political economy from Rutgers University.

Social Media: (LinkedIN)(Twitter)(Facebook)

DESCRIPTION

There are significant gaps in our information about post-secondary education and training. For example, we do not know how much students earn after graduating from a program or how many are employed. We do not know how their outcomes vary by race/ethnicity, gender, economic status, disability status, or for veterans. And we have no way to compare their outcomes with those of graduates of other programs. Without this information, it is difficult to determine whether education and training programs are equitably providing people with the skills they need for today’s in-demand jobs.

Some states have stepped up and created data systems with public facing websites that show such information. But such information is not available nationwide. The reauthorization of the Higher Education Act (HEA) offers the opportunity to remedy this situation. The College Transparency Act would amend HEA and create a national, student level data network that includes data on student characteristics, programs of study, and employment and earnings outcomes. Students, program administrators, and policymakers would be able to see educational and labor market outcomes for different populations attending different programs of study at institutions around the nation, and the data would be comparable from one program to another. All this, while strengthening protections for privacy and data security.

This data is critical for students who want to make good decisions about enrolling in a post-secondary program, for policymakers who want to responsibly invest taxpayer dollars, and for colleges and other training providers that want to improve programs for all people.

At this session, the Director of the Workforce Data Quality Campaign, Bryan Wilson, will discuss the effort to provide transparent information on post-secondary programs and how this information would advance efforts to achieve equity. Bryan will demonstrate state websites that already provide such information and discuss the College Transparency Act that would create such a data service nationwide.

Bryan oversaw the creation of the most comprehensive state tools for information on postsecondary education and workforce program outcomes (Washington State’s Career Bridge and Workforce Training Results) and is currently working with others in D.C. to enact the College Transparency Act.

The session will include a demonstration of Washington’s Career Bridge website that has descriptions for more than 6,000 programs at four-year colleges, and community and technical colleges, private vocational schools, as well as apprenticeships and training programs run by nonprofit organizations. About 1,600 of the program descriptions include data about completion rates and post-program employment rates, industry of employment, and earnings. The session will also share information from Washington’s “Workforce Training Results,” including labor market outcomes for populations of interest.

The session will provide up-to-date information on the College Transparency Act (CTA) and the effort to create a national student level data network to would provide similar information nationwide. CTA would authorize the collection of student level data from all postsecondary programs eligible to serve students receiving federal financial aid under Title IV of the Higher Education Act. The data would include information on student: race/ethnicity, age, gender, veteran status, and other demographic information. The student level data would be matched with administrative records containing employment and earnings such that one could know the labor market outcomes for students of each population for each program of study.

Session attendees will receive a fact sheet describing the major provisions of CTA. The session will include examples of how data can be used by policymakers and program administrators to improve equitable outcomes, and by prospective students who want to enroll in a program that successfully serves people like themselves.

Student Centered Advocacy: Tools that build one voice for student success

button-download-workshop-filesStrand: Public Policy—Supporting Equity and Education
Time: Thursday, April 19, 2018 from 8:15 – 9:30 am
Room: Yorktown

ABSTRACT

This session will highlight new student centered advocacy tools that help local communities develop relationships and build joint policy platforms. Participants will gain insight into a suite of research-based, online resources that lay the foundation for a variety of advocacy efforts to address opportunity gaps.

PRESENTER(s)

Presenter 1

Alexis Holmes
Senior Policy Analyst
National Education Association

Biography: Alexis Holmes is a senior policy analyst for the National Education Association. She is responsible for engaging partners and reviewing policies related to secondary schools, career and technical education, and family engagement. Previously, she has served as an NEA minority community outreach liaison and director of government relations for the College Board.

Presenter 2

dharrisaikensDonna Harris-Aikens
Director of Education Policy & Practice
National Education Association

Biography: Donna Harris-Aikens is the Director of the Education Policy and Practice Department at the National Education Association. She manages all policy related to elementary and secondary education issues, as well as early education, higher education, and career technical education. In addition, Mrs. Harris-Aikens leads the association’s national, state, and local advocacy efforts for implementation of the Every Student Succeeds Act. Prior to joining NEA, she served as the policy manager for Service Employees International Union’s Public Services Division (SEIU), and also served as director of government relations for the National Association of State Directors of Career Technical Education Consortium. Mrs. Harris-Aikens earned her law degree from Howard
University School of Law, and is an active member of the District of Columbia Bar.

DESCRIPTION

Student Centered Advocacy: Tools that build one voice for student success is a session created for education opportunity advocates. As implementation of the Every Student Succeeds Act transitions to local planning, it is becoming increasing important that local families and communities engage and offer their voice for their schools. This session will highlight new student centered advocacy tools that help local communities develop relationships and build joint policy platforms. Participants will experience and gain insight into a suite of research-based, online resources that lay the foundation for a variety of advocacy efforts to ensure that our students’ success does not depend on living in the right neighborhood.

Dual Enrollment and Equity Through a Federal Policy Lens

button-download-workshop-files Strand: Public Policy—Supporting Equity and Education
Time: Tuesday, April 17, 2018 from 10:45 – 12:00 pm
Room: Yorktown

ABSTRACT

The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) presents a unique opportunity for states and districts to help more young people enter and complete college by implementing school designs that improve the transition between high school and higher education such as dual enrollment, concurrent enrollment, and early college high school, and explicitly defines and encourages states to use these approaches. As a result, there has been significant growth in the inclusion of dual enrollment and early college in state accountability systems, growing from 14 under previous federal requirements to 33 under ESSA. This session will examine the provisions in ESSA supporting dual enrollment and early college. In addition, the presenter will discuss best practices and how districts can work with states going forward to confront the challenges of ensuring that equity is a central focus of the work ahead so that low income and under-represented students are integral to the expansion of college in high school.

PRESENTER(s)

Presenter 1

Alex Perry
Coordinator
The Majority Group on behalf of the College in High School Alliance